Harald Jezek

Owner, Nuada beauty+wellness

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What can we learn from Nelson Mandela ?

Nelson Mandela is dead, but over his life of 95 years he fundamentally changed South Africa.
What can we learn from him ? What is his legacy ?

  • Dec 10 2013: When you do not consider yourself as a victim, you can do wonderful things.
  • Dec 8 2013: "27 years prison life "couldn't beat him down to struggle for his faith and believe:no racism,no apartheid,equal opportunity for everyone.His brilliant spirits,dignity and perseverance will be alive in this world eternally.He should be all of us good example to know what we live for in this world.
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    Dec 8 2013: Nelson Mandela was a great personality, as right as Gandhi or Martin Luther King.
    What we have to learn from him is that hope never goes on. If we don’t fight for what we want, we’ll never attain our goals.
    Another important thing is that we shouldn’t be spiteful toward people who have humiliated us. Nobody’s perfect and everyone is able to make mistakes, but should recognize its mistakes and apologize. Violence doesn’t solve problems, but stubbornness does.
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    Dec 8 2013: The same thing that we learned from Dr Martin Luther King, Jr., Mahatma Gandi, and Thomas Jefferson:

    All men are created equal
    Each is endowed with certain unalienable rights, and among those are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
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      Dec 14 2013: Actually the talk was published after I started the conversation, but yes, I'll add it.
  • Dec 14 2013: Unfortunately as I will be asleep when this conversation ends I do not wish to debate with Carlo! I'm pretty sure he has not lived with the Nelson Mandela legacy which has so fundamentally changed my life and the life of all South Africans.
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      Dec 14 2013: Ah, I forgot about the time difference. Have a good night ! :-)
  • Dec 14 2013: I have learned that what Nelson Mandela has represented in my lifetime is his presence and guidance and providing a cornerstone for our society - I live in Cape Town where we have vast disparities in our society. I am "middle class", white and have taught in multi-racial schools for most of my life. Now that the essence of him has gone, I feel a profound loss and have stayed tearfully connected to radio, television and associated twitter media while I grieve.

    I am convinced that his death has had a similar effect on our SA society and world wide and hope that his values of promoting peace, harmony, and Ubuntu might make us all wiser citizens who can make a greater effort to live in harmony together through projects such as 67 minutes and many others.
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      Dec 14 2013: Hi Carolynn, thanks for your comment. It's interesting to read your view which is exactly the opposite of Carlo Randall's views (see his comments below). Is this disparity in views representative for the SA society ?
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    Dec 13 2013: " Nelson Mandela is dead, but over his life of 95 years he fundamentally changed South Africa.
    What can we learn from him ? What is his legacy ?"

    "However, this topic isn't about S-Africa, but about a specific person, Nelson Mandela."

    question: is this not contradictory???

    name association:

    ghandi -
    martin luther king jr -
    fidel castro-

    libya

    after all this is a debate...
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      Dec 13 2013: The question is simple: "What can we learn from Nelson Mandela ?!
      Your opinion is that there is nothing to be learned from him.

      I disagree with you because for one he showed that one man can stand up against the whole system (and he paid dearly for that).
      We so often hear, "it's only me, I can't make a difference", but he showed that this is not true. Everybody can make a difference if committed.
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      Dec 13 2013: Let me ask you something:
      As far as I can deduct from your posts, you are from S-Africa and you are black. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
      If this is correct, you must have experienced apartheid personally. Did you enjoy it ? Do you want it back ?
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        Dec 13 2013: you speak as if you know apartheid... its become a word so easily flung around as if it were european or american racism...

        you are most racist for considering me black... please explain
        is it because you assume i'm african or south african?
        i am interested in how you would stereotype me...

        yes to all 3...

        ps. mandela was the ace the up the sleeve that allowed the then ruling class to own and keep the land... there are no homelands
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          Dec 13 2013: You don't have to live apartheid to understand what it is. I assume you didn't live the holocaust either but I suppose you have a pretty good idea what it was.
          Why is considering you black racist ??? As a matter of fact, color means nothing for me. You could be purple for all practical purpose and I wouldn't give a damn.
          Btw, assuming that a S-African (or African) must be black would be rather stupid.
          I don't stereotype you, but deduct certain things from your posts. These deductions might be right or wrong.
          I also find it interesting that you use a "First People" emblem, considering that "First Peoples" defends the rights of indigenous populations around the globe while apartheid was pretty much the opposite, curtailing the rights of the S-African native population.
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    Dec 12 2013: Transition was not fast enough during the eighties and towards the late eighties although laws were on paper they were not enforced.... "Moving into a new era" the freeing of Mandela was symbolic token of ending segregation...Hence being handed the presidency... Keep in mind South Africa is not part of the common wealth, but an Independent state with political affiliations also like the rest of the free world South Africa was fighting communism

    1994 is the election and he is elected, he brings in ANC cronies with no experience in governance, he closes all "apartheid institutes" - educational facilities , he lowers standard of education and entry level requirements, he privatises state resources, he cannot reform the land as there policy is only from 1913...
    Apologies that was not him...
    It was the politicians put there to do it... He adopted an educational policy that requires a FF to pass. Have you seen the quality of government education in South Africa???
    And you honestly expect to trust and uneducated society???

    With regards to land... The South African government owns less than 80% of the land.
    You think racism has ended with policies like affirmative action???

    Which would you prefer: segregated injustice or democratic injustice?
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      Dec 12 2013: I'm not disputing that S-Africa is a mess and the ANC as the leading group has to assume a large part of the blame.
      However, this topic isn't about S-Africa, but about a specific person, Nelson Mandela.

      "You think racism has ended with policies like affirmative action??? "
      Obviously not, racism is in the mind of people and changing policies doesn't change the mind. However, changing policies is a necessary beginning if you want to change people's minds. And changing people's minds will take time, perhaps at least 1 generation.

      "Which would you prefer: segregated injustice or democratic injustice?" - Neither
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        Dec 13 2013: do you not think that your statement is overzealous??:" but over his life of 95 years he fundamentally changed South Africa".
        However, this topic isn't about S-Africa, but about a specific person, Nelson Mandela.

        democratic injustice:
        -affirmative action is racism towards people who are not black or considered not to be african enough-
        Obviously not, racism is in the mind of people and changing policies doesn't change the mind. However, changing policies is a necessary beginning if you want to change people's minds.

        policy does not teach racism nor does it change a person...

        What can we learn from him ? - you cannot learn anything from a man who left "his" country in shambles and went jet setting around the world preaching sweet words of peace and justice...

        What is his legacy ? - He is an icon to the rest of the world but to many South Africans he sold out his country and people.

        maybe you should visit south africa and then elaborate about his fundamental change.... before you ask "what can you learn from mandela"???
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          Dec 13 2013: This is your view to which you are entitled. Obviously many people, including S-African don't agree with you.

          "policy does not teach racism nor does it change a person... " No, but policies provide the environment in which people act.
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        Dec 13 2013: its always been my view...

        and no... you the only one

        visit south africa and then elaborate about his fundamental change.... before you ask "what can you learn from mandela"?
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          Dec 13 2013: "and no... you the only one"
          Which obviously is a false statement because apparently nobody who commented here shares your view.
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    Dec 10 2013: That you're easily labeled a terrorists by the US, and that you may still have tea with the queen after that.. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/from-terrorist-to-tea-with-the-queen-1327902.html

    I also learned that David Cameron wished to hang him at one point... http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2013/dec/09/nelson-mandela-death-davd-cameron-ed-miliband
    And that he didn't give the "I have a dream" speech... http://popdust.com/2013/12/05/paris-hilton-nelson-mandela-death-tweet-martin-luther-kinglson-mandela-hisz-i-have-a-dream-speech/

    But to be serious, Nelson Mandela has really inspired me to have faith in myself and in humanity. His story has alleviated much pressure that I previously felt to be "perfect" in societies eyes. And he's inspired me to find much inner peace, funny how people you've never met or spoken to can influence you...
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    Dec 10 2013: There's a new talk released about your thread today.
    http://www.ted.com/talks/boyd_varty_what_i_learned_from_nelson_mandela.html
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    Dec 9 2013: there is nothing to learn from him... revolutionaries keep fighting the same battle of injustice because they do not evolve in their thinking and actions

    all he gave south africa was superficial freedom and equality...
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      Dec 9 2013: Let me get that right. You suppose that injustice shouldn't be fought ? In addition, do you believe that S-Africa isn't better off after abolishing apartheid ?
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        Dec 11 2013: apartheid was abolished before mandela was released....
        mandela's release was symbolic like the destroying of the german wall

        and yes! south africa was better off during apartheid

        nelson spent 1 term in office, that is 4 years.

        you cannot admire or learn from someone who turned his back on his people and country....
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          Dec 11 2013: "apartheid was abolished before mandela was released...."
          Says who ? When he was released in 1990, the president was de Klerk with whom he negotiated. Elections where then in 1994 and that's when he became president. Basically apartheid was abolished in the years between his release and the elections.

          Explain your point: "and yes! south africa was better off during apartheid !

          "...who turned his back on his people and country.": You mean because he fought racism ?

          Btw, Mandela was president from 1994 - 1999. On my computer that makes 5 years and not 4.
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    Dec 8 2013: That thoughts, wisdom and prudence have no color. That one can invite the enemy to collaborate after winning. That there can be a common ground of calm righteousness in a fractured world of 'otherness'.
    We can learn all those things from Madiba.
    He is the best world has seen after Gandhi.
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    Dec 8 2013: I learn and understand that " " :

    The power of silence. Move on and make things better.