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Poch Peralta

Freelance Writer / Blogger,

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Will you shun social networking if you are a star?

Celebs Who Shun Social Media
My primary purpose for social networking is to promote my articles and designs and to get ideas from feedbacks. I don't think I'll need to that anymore if I am a star. Among seven others, George Clooney, Julia Roberts, and Kate Hudson — all spoke out against social networking.
http://www.popsugar.com/Celebrities-Arent-Social-Media-32431852

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    Nov 18 2013: Now when you say star, you mean famous, right, Poch. Well, what kind of articles and designs are you doing, Poch, you know very few authors and designers become stars, you can probably name a lot of famous movie actors but very few famous authors. If you want to become famous as an author, you may have to work like a dog and take advantage of every opportunity to publicize yourself. Does Stephen King have a Twitter account, he's the only famous author I can think of.
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      Nov 18 2013: Well Greg, don't forget that I've already said I use social networking to
      promote what I write and create (publicize myself). And contrary to that,
      I said I will not do social networking if I am a movie star. 'Star' also
      means wealthy to me. But I won't publicize myself for mansions and yachts
      if I'm already a star living comfortably.
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        Nov 19 2013: Yeah, you're right, Poch, you did say you already use it. But what is your objection to using it if you're a star, you gave us an article where some stars say why they don't use it, but you haven't said why you wouldn't use it.

        You know, it's one thing to become a star, but once you become one, you still have to work to stay one. I suppose different stars go different ways to remain a star, but social networking could help you to remain a star after you become one. You might find that even after you become a star, you may need social networking to remain a star.
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          Nov 19 2013: Oh...I wouldn't use it because if I'm already a star living comfortably, I will do all I can to have privacy. I wouldn't want to ever sue a papparazzi. Or possibly assault one.

          '...but social networking could help you to remain a star after you become one. You might find that even after you become a star, you may need social networking to remain a star.'

          Excellent point I agree with Greg! But it's another question of whether I want to remain a star or not. If I need to remain a star to live comfortably, then I'll probably do social networking.
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        Nov 19 2013: but wait a second, Poch, you don't need to be a star to live comfortably. You're not a star right now, are you living comfortably?
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          Nov 19 2013: lol are you a sleuth Greg? I feel like being investigated by one :-D
          That is exactly why I do networking -- because It might help me
          live comfortably.
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        Nov 19 2013: no, not a professional sleuth, Poch. Just enjoy talking about fame, stars, etc.

        Are you making a living as a writer, Poch, or how are you paying your bills? Are you currently living comfortably, or how is your life uncomfortable?

        As far as tweeting goes, if you don't want to do it because you want to protect your privacy and you can have the lifestyle you want without it, fine. Some people enjoy living their life more in public, I would say I'm more that way.
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          Nov 19 2013: Someone has said: 'Writing is the only profession where people
          don't find it ridiculous if you don't earn money.' That was said because
          most writers don't earn enough money from writing. Me included.

          Don't get me wrong Greg. I like being private but I enjoy networking
          -- only-- with sensible people like you and many others at TED.
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        Nov 19 2013: Well, what are you finding on other sites besides TED, that the people aren't sensible? In what way aren't they sensible?

        Sometimes when someone seems at first like they're not sensible you can guide them to being more sensible by asking intelligent questions, or making intelligent comments, have you ever had this experience?
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          Nov 19 2013: First off, I'm not saying that ALL users on Facebook and Twitter are not sensible.
          I just find that most of their messages aren't useful to many. Many are even just
          shamelessly self-promoting.

          'Sometimes when someone seems at first like they're not sensible you can guide them to being more sensible by asking intelligent questions, or making intelligent comments, have you ever had this experience?'

          You're being sarcastic aren't you? Just joking. Of course I've done that just like
          what you're doing now. And that's when you get hurt most at networking --
          they waste your questions and comments by ignoring them.
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        Nov 20 2013: Well, I haven't used Facebook or Twitter, Poch, so I would not know. I often read the comments on YouTube videos, and they are pretty good, they show you new aspects of the videos that you didn't think of before.

        You said that you are using Facebook and Twitter to promote yourself? But apparently you are not enjoying it? For me, it is important to find a way to promote yourself that you enjoy, I definitely promote my ideas on the Web, but in a way I enjoy. The way I am doing it now is to find sites that relate somehow to my interest, and leave a comment. For example, I have been living almost entirely on skim milk for the last five years. This has been a good experience so I promote it. I enter "all milk diet" on Google, which brings up sites that talk about this topic in some regard, although usually not exactly from the same angle as me. Then I leave a comment about my experience.

        Making a comment or question, in my mind, is never wasted. Even if they don't answer back, in most cases they read it, so it does touch them. I leave many comments and questions on TED conversations that never get responded to, but I don't feel like they are wasted. Plus leaving a comment or question forces you to put into words what you think or feel, so it is valuable to you in that way, too.
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          Nov 20 2013: Wow Greg. And I thought Jasmine was joking lol. Are you the pioneer 'milktarian'?
          Why do you do that? Sounds almost as good as vegetarian.

          That's keen. Yes. I've heard someone else said that -- comments are never wasted.
          It's a way of practicing writing too.

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