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Hassan H

Yunus Social Business

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Sport as a school of life: What Values, Virtues and Principles Sports teach us ?

Dear TED Family,

I often talk about how Sport is the perfect environment to develop some of life’s most needed skills.

I wanted to take this opportunity to ask you about how Sports helped you to develop positive inner strength, enhance Human qualities and reinforce social bounds.

I am looking forward to hearing your stories and lessons learned !

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  • Nov 18 2013: 1. There are the privileged few and the worthless many.
    2. The privileged few get high social status and better conditions for doing something that is not actually useful.
    3. The privileged few are allowed to push around the worthless many.
    4. One of the worthless many may gain some status by being a lackey of the privileged few.
    5. There is no justice when one of the privileged few confronts one of the worthless many.
    6. Rules do not apply to the privileged few, only to the worthless many.
    7. Standards do not apply to the privileged few, only to the worthless many.

    These are the lessons that sports taught me, as a member of the worthless many.
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      Nov 23 2013: I really think that you bring up the most overlooked perspective of sports Bryan.
      Almost everyone seems to just think about sports as something positive, not even reflecting about eventual negative consequences it may bring to society.

      I'm all for play and fun and exercise and that was likely the way sports used to be once, but that's in no way the things sports promote today as I see it.

      It promotes elitism, Us-vs-Them-thinking, and only provide exercise for those who are already fit, the ones that aren't physically fit are discouraged from participating because they bring the rest down...

      I believe that there are some sports that don't promote these values as much but all of the main sports tend to bring this mindset.

      Sorry to bash on all the people that view sports as the big salvation for human health and good moral values.
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          Nov 23 2013: It is useful that you bring up the spectator, who had until your post been omitted from the discussion.

          Your post raised to me a dimension parallel to the one some have mentioned that competitive sport can have a quite different effect on those who are good at it than on those who feel marginalized or shunned by peers for not being good enough to make a competitive contribution. Both types of experience have been represented in the comments in the thread.

          You quote one theorist who puts forward that the violence of the sport is positively correlated with the pleasure to participant and viewer. But for the many who find that sort of violence truly repelling, being within a very sports focused milieu can be isolating and negative.

          (This is distinct from non-competitive physical activities, which promote good health and typically positive feelings).
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          Nov 23 2013: Theodor,

          Your argument is "ad populum" and does not confirm anything except that it's something people do...

          I can't find anything on The Catharsis Theory by Konrad Lorenz, however his theory on aggression seems to concern some of these aspects, but I fail to see any of his thesis's as anything resembling a theory... Check the criticism to understand why.
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Aggression#Criticism
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          Nov 23 2013: Theodor,

          I thought that you meant to make it an argument of proof (or rather one supporting it), that's the way I read it.

          And I do not consider my argument to be ad populum since an ad populum argument is designed to "prove" that something is true because many find it so. When I say "Almost everyone seems" it is rather the reverse of an ad populum argument. I'm not siding with the majority here, how could it possibly be ad populum?

          I believe that behavior mostly promotes more of the same behavior (and I can give you the TED Talks to support this if you haven't seen it) and therefore I take the position that it " promotes aggressive behavior"
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          Nov 24 2013: Moving on.

          Yes, of course(?)

          Teaching is providing education/knowledge/skill.
          Learning is obtaining it.

          Semantics make up the meaning of things, without them it's just gibberish...

          Sport does both, the coaches and such teach (as do player to each other) and the practitioners learn.

          What do you mean by "...raises the issue of active intent and passive circumstance." do you mean to say that sport means well but might not always succeed or am I getting it wrong?

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