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How would you define being "human"?

This question was sparked by a fellow classmate during Theory of Knowledge. He gave some clarifying examples or lead-ins, which may help you guys understand what I'm asking and guide your answers (not toward one answer hopefully).

My classmate said that there was a kid who had lost part of her brain function, due to an accident. Apparently, they put in some sort of device that simulated that area of her brain that was lost. Broadening this concept, if someone's entire brain was replaced with something inorganic and programmed to such an extent that it was indistinguishable from before the surgery, is that person still human? This naturally leads to the subquestion: are a person's traits, emotions, and opinions the only aspect of his humanity or humanness?
After thinking about your response to that situation, what if we flipped the situation? Now we have an inorganic body, but an organic brain. Would you still consider this entity to be 'human'? What if the inorganic body had a non-human shape, such as a triangle? This should all lead to the subquestion: how does an entity's appearance affect its humanness?
Now, the last combination of brain and body: a totally inorganic entity that is seems completely human. This obviously would require a bunch of programming and robotics, but I wouldn't say it's outside of the realm of possibilities (and even if it was, it seems like a good thought experiment to narrow down how you would define humanity). This leads to my last subquestion (for now :)): how does an entity's organic nature (was it born or manufactured) affect its humanity?

I have some ideas currently, but am sure I will have to add on, edit, or completely change my theory after I see your guys' responses! As always, feel free to ask clarifying questions.

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      Nov 18 2013: To clarify, you are saying that having a large amount of free will makes something human?

      I'd agree with you that we are generally more freely willed than other animals, but I think we do have some moral contraints at the very least.
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          Nov 18 2013: I see what you mean, but don't quite agree. I currently think that morality is all based off the most fundamental instinct to not kill other humans. This evolves into not harming others, then not harming them financially, and so on. Now the extent to which we extend this line from the basic instinct depends on the person, but the basic instinct is the same for all humans (and for most of the entities (for lack of a better word) that are able to make choices).

          But besides the above discussion, don't you have contraints in what you do (even if they aren't the same as mine)?
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          Nov 18 2013: That was quite a complex definition of a human :)

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