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Yen Yang

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Is having a social class inevitable?

Will the gap between rich and poor be omnipresent? Can it be abolished? If you propose socialism to get rid of the classes, are you very sure the gap will not come back? Should we then solve this problem or leave it be?

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  • Nov 18 2013: Much as we disparage the thought, we are animals. All mammals have social order, whether we are talking the alpha/ beta/ gamma/ omega/ pariah of wild wolves or the loose colony structure of feral domestic shorthair cats. There is always someone who wants to be top dog. There are always members who want to improve their social standing and members who want to 'drop out'. If we removed the issues of poor mental and physical health and made all humans phenotypically equal, there would still be strivers and loafers. Add to this that all species of animals are 'programmed' genetically for xenophobia (while it means fear of the strange, it actually works out to more of a 'drawn to the like') thus us and them mentality is hardwired into animals to preserve species and reduce hybridization rates. You always have individuals who 'lack' the genes or whose coding reverses the desire so that there is a craving for the exotic but it is uncommon. Us is not them.

    Some of the posters have confused 'communism' with 'socialism'. One is political, one is economic and there are few purely socialist countries. Invariably, even where the political entity enforces an economic system (USSR or USA), you wind up with a mixed bag. The USSR fell, in part, because they couldn't make soap. The workers would steal the ingredients for home made products to be sold by individuals to individuals on the black (very capitalistic) market. Individuals like to believe they have some control over their own destiny.

    Altruism is rare. Look up the Lincoln Is Late Due to a Pig in the Mud story. Charitable giving and acts are almost always done because the doer achieves some level of satisfaction from the giving. Remove all incentive for achievement, all personal involvement in 'doing good' and you wind up in a society that can't make soap. You can preach all you want about tides and boats but most folks will still trust their own oars best.

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