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Chantal Soldini

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What can we do to improve human population control?

Besides world hunger, poverty and inequality, humanity faces another social phenoma: over-population. I recently read Dan Brown's newly published book Inferno. The book talks about over-population and (spoiler alert!) how a plague was produced to leave 1/3 of the population infertile.

It got me thinking, if we did find the technology to do this, would we do it? Should we? Then again, isn't reproduction a basic human right? Yet, this same right is making our already limited resources even more limited.

What do you think fellow TEDizens. Are we taking enough initiative as it is regarding birth control? Are campaings of contraceptive methods enough or should we have a more radical approach? There are already countries that support the idea of population control, amidst them China and India. Is this enough?

Let me know what you think.

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  • Nov 10 2013: I was originally thinking that China's "one-baby-only" rule was probably the best bet since it has shown the best results: their population has steadied radically. But then again, China's rules cannot be regulated the same way in other countries. For example, in other countries like India, this rule would have no impact on the population because the government does not and cannot keep track of everyone. Then I thought that educating women and having classes regarding family life can help somewhat. But many people (and their parents, and other family members) already have prior beliefs on having children and these kind of classes will not have an effect on them. I just came back from India and many people in rural India still have the mentality that having many children is a good thing.

    I believe the only solution is a long-term solution, one that will take at least a generation to show any results. It is simply education. No sex-education or anything like that, but sending children to school or at least give them some sort of education. The only reason I see this is because of the recent trend I've seen, especially in cities: poor people are having more kids than rich people, and that is a huge problem. And I think the difference is how they grew up.....based on their parent's education. It's all one big cycle.

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