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Gerald O'brian

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If the cure for mortality is found within your lifetime, would you go for it and become immortal?

On the one hand, we're not made for eternal youth. And one could argue that knowing life is short (or just limited) is what makes it worth living. And perhaps death is a major spiritual part of life, whether you believe in a soul or in a metaphorical one.
On the other hand, how is aging yet not another disease? Dying at age 80 is no more a "natural" death than being eaten alive by a bear or killed by malaria. In fact, "old age" is probably the most unnatural cause of death, statistically. So all that's probably just a cultural habit : diseases are evil but aging is good. Another point is that, well, things have changed. Perhaps our new environment makes it suitable for immortal youths.
And of course, becoming immortal only means that you die when YOU chose to die.

So would you go for the injection or not, and how do you rationalize your decision?

Thanks!

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    Nov 15 2013: An interesting thought, but I don't see mortality being cured.
    Our goal is not to live forever, at least not in my beliefs.

    I hope and pray for a much better world when I leave here.
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      Nov 15 2013: We're supposed to die because of the snake's misguidance, I know, I know. But haven't we paid the debt already? Look at all the good done by people who don't even expect to be rewarded in an afterlife, look how morally superior we are to our abrahamic ancestry.
      What do you believe is our goal?
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        Nov 15 2013: never in history rulers said: you were ruled long enough. i will rule no longer.
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          Nov 16 2013: Cincinnatus and George Washington are noteworthy exceptions. Though I suspect they did it because of how cool it made them look.
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        Nov 20 2013: Re: "What do you believe is our goal?"
        Our goal is what we believe our goal is, I believe.
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        Nov 20 2013: You made an interesting post. Religion does not make anyone morally superior, I know, I know. But neither does rejection thereof.

        Re: "We're supposed to die because of the snake's misguidance, I know, I know. But haven't we paid the debt already?"

        If you read the story, the misguidance started with questioning that we have an obligation (debt) - exactly what you do in your second sentence. By the way, according to the Christian doctrine, we did not pay any debt. It was paid for us. A minor detail.

        Re: "Look at all the good done by people who don't even expect to be rewarded in an afterlife, look how morally superior we are to our abrahamic ancestry."

        "The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, ‘God, I thank You that I am not like other men—extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this tax collector." - Luke 18. Self-righteousness. Also warned against.

        I don't mean to preach, but I find Christianity fascinating because it is self-refuting. Speaking against it is speaking against self.

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