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Is money the only way to reach happiness, satisfaction, or sense of completion?

It seems like money is the only way to get one's wish.
Do you really need money to be happy?
What are other ways in which people reach happiness, satisfaction, or sense of completion?

Maybe that special someone gives you that sense of completion and happiness. Any other examples would be great. What do you do to enjoy life?

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    Oct 23 2013: Money is only a tool and not worth anything in itself. It only facilitates the exchange of goods.
    So, the question should probably be whether material possessions are the only way to happiness
    I'd say no. There are many examples of people that are not rich and live happy and fulfilled lives.
    On the other hand there are people who have everything from a material point of view and still aren't happy.
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      Oct 23 2013: Harald!!! You're back!!! Haven't seen you for ages!!! Very happy to see you, and it doesn't cost a cent!!!

      I agree....,money is a tool:>)
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        Oct 23 2013: Hi Colleen, good to see you too ! :-)
        How are you doing ? Judging from this profile pic, you seem to be doing fine.
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          Oct 23 2013: I'm good Harald......feeling happily content, and I don't have much money. Hope you are well too my friend. Judging from your profile pic, you haven't changed a bit:>)
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        Oct 23 2013: So you are proof that (lots of) money isn't necessary for happiness ;-)
        I'm not sure if I changed, but my photo for sure didn't. Still the same one I uploaded when I registered, hahaha.
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          Oct 23 2013: Correct Harald.....I am living proof that lots of money isn't necessary for happiness. I had more money at one time, but the economy.....the market......you know about that "stuff":>)

          I realize your photo is the same one from way back when, which is why I made the comment. I may have lost some money, but I don't think I am losing my mind........yet! hahahahaha:>)
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    Oct 22 2013: Money is the universal commodity.

    The idea of commodity relates to what we need to consume .. now, and some reserve for when commodities are not being produced for one reason or another .. mostly seasons.

    Humans make an artform out of standardising all needs into categories of commodity.

    Consider this:

    money is the unit of exact transaction - there is no residue when you use the universal commodity to measure and exchange value (value is the consumable component of exchange).

    A monetary transaction has no margin of adaptation - it is a unit of adaption.

    Adaption is generally at the expense of adaptability.

    we trade adaptability back and forth in expectation of the period of scarcity that each judges between this consumption and the next production.

    Humans are the most adaptable species on the planet - the least adapted. We are hopeless failures as a single creature .. might last a few days on our own. So we have this variable field of adaptability that we can trade bak and forth between us.

    The problem with money is that it's binary - one-on-one, and there is no adaptive residue.

    When a culture does not use money, it is assumes that "what goes around comes around" and it becomes infinitely networked.

    The issuer of money takes absolute control of the value residue - this is most easily seen in usury (charging interest is usury - it used to be a death sentence if you got caught doing that). However, the use of money is still usury even if interest is not charged because it atomises communities and makes them slaves to the issuer of currency.

    Currency is invented only for the payment of taxes to states and tithes to churches.

    The state and the church are parasites that enslave community and family.

    The community without money operate on a gift basis where prestige is earned by giving.

    Whenever money is in use, the prestige defaults to the taker - this is called thievery in most languages.

    However, the hoarding is needed to get through winter - how?
  • Nov 13 2013: "... the things we admire in men, kindness and generosity, openness, honesty, understanding and feeling, are the concomitants of failure in our system. And those traits we detest, sharpness, greed, acquisitiveness, meanness, egotism and self-interest, are the traits of success. And while men admire the quality of the first they love the produce of the second."
    John Steinbeck
  • Nov 11 2013: I guess it depends on how you define happiness, satisfaction and completion. If you define happiness as self sufficiency then living out in the woods and living off the land would work for you. if you define happiness as having a large home, filled with lots of toys then money is a requirement because you cannot trade chickens for ipads. The most recent surveys would indicate that those who chase money to buy happiness wind up not so happy. However, my dad says that having a career that you love is vital for satisfaction, happiness and a sense of completion. (not sure I agree).

    Bottom line, it is a personal thing like most. There is no correct answer. I would be perfectly happy, satisfied and complete if i could watch netflix and play games all day where as my dad requires traveling everywhere seeing everything that's out there. His idea of happiness is quite expensive mine less so but still requires money.

    Money is a vessel, an end, not a destination just like happiness, satisfaction and completion.
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    Oct 30 2013: We only need as much money as it takes to cover our basic needs.

    If our personal wealth is below that threshold, then potential happiness gets smothered by survival needs. Add to that the mix of guilt, shame, inadequacy that one is unable to survive successfully in a society that judges one on that ability, then happiness is as distant a goal as it could possibly get. Why else do people feel the need to get into outrageous and crippling amounts of debt, just to have a symbol of financial success parked on the drive?

    The converse may also be true in a society that does NOT judge people on their accumulation of wealth. Happiness is more likely to be self-perpetuated, more profound as a result, and independent of personal wealth.

    In our broken society, the following is the first issue that needs to be addressed:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=slTF_XXoKAQ

    Mend this, and the rest will follow.
    • Nov 11 2013: nice, maslow hierarchy of needs.
  • Oct 28 2013: Money is a vehicle by which a sense of security can be reached. In order to reach a truly enlightened happiness, one must find a sense of security in order for his mind to calculate the various criteria of what his personal brand of happiness is. Those criteria, along with the amount of security needed to explore one's happiness, vary per the individual.
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    Oct 27 2013: All right, all right, we know that money doesn't buy happiness. But let's be honest: More money doesn't exactly make us miserable, either.

    The wealthy enjoy an intangible benefit that often eludes the paycheck-to-paycheck worker: a sense of control over their lives. They feel secure in their jobs and less stressed about their futures. (Plus, they can order room service instead of trying to make three meals out of a Subway sandwich.)

    But are they much happier than the rest of us wage-earning, '90s-model-Camry-driving schlubs? Not really.

    Rich! Happy? Not really
    Studies show that lottery winners, heiresses, and the 100 richest Americans are only slightly more satisfied than the guy toiling for his pay in the generic office-park cubicle. Still, mere mortals find it difficult to allow that an extra digit or two on the paycheck won't put a permanent smile on our faces.

    Why is it so hard to accept the idea that increased wealth doesn't markedly improve our mental health?

    Happy amnesia
    The ability to imagine -- to try to predict our future state of mind -- is what sets us apart from less-evolved species. It's also the very thing that stunts our shot at true happiness.

    We assume that a sportier car, a bigger house, a better-paying job, or that dress will bring us joy because, well, they did in the past, right?

    Not really, says Daniel Gilbert, a Harvard psychology professor and the author of Stumbling on Happiness. "Research reveals that memory is less like a collection of photographs than it is like a collection of impressionist paintings rendered by an artist who takes considerable license with his subject," Gilbert writes. We forget that the new-car high deflated well before our first trip to the mechanic, and the raise came with stressful late nights at the office and a steeper tax tab.
    • Nov 11 2013: I guess you're saying the grass is greener on the other side of the fence. I agree. If I suddenly came in to billions overnight, it would make me ecstatic for a while but then it would feel empty because i didn't accomplish something. That is why billionaires don't retire, they work till they're dead.
  • Oct 27 2013: Dpends what that wish is. It can't make you desire anything you hadn't desired before the money.money won't make you truly love Something as in art or science or whatever.
  • Oct 25 2013: Money can bring happiness yes for some obvious reason. Suppose like you are poor and all you need to do is work for your livelihood you need money. SO money brings happiness for some special types of purpose. On the other hand money cant bring happiness. because when people are having lots of money they cant even control their whole mind. Its really difficult for anyone.
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    Oct 25 2013: .

    We can reach any of them without money
    by making things a-step-better for keeping our DNA alive.

    (No matter how small the step may be)
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    Oct 24 2013: Pure happiness and satisfaction must come from within you. Personally, I used to think satisfaction came from climbing the corporate ladder and having power over colleagues and employees. Unfortunately, we live in a world (and American society has multiplied this culture 10 fold) where bigger is better and a certain status speaks of your character. I think it's too easy to get sucked into that way of thinking. Truth is, if you have happiness in yourself, satisfaction with your own life, and can give and receive love from your companion, that's all you need. Of course, we need money, the resource that holds no real meaning other than a tool to barter with and provides shelter and food.
  • Oct 24 2013: Money doesnt buy happiness but poverty does buy misery.. Money is a resource which provides every other resource including freedom and power. Think of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.. Money is essential for the bottom aspects of the pyramid such as security, food, and shelter however money can never bring you to the top of that pyramid which is love, relationships, purpose and self-actualization
  • Da Way

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    Oct 23 2013: Of course it's not the only way, but it's often the quickest way. If you define your goals and identify what are the things that will provide you with happiness, satisfaction and sense of completion, and then analyse the role of wealth in those goals, you often find that 1) money helps, and 2) even if you can achieve your goals without money, money can push what you're trying to accomplish even further!

    The important thing is control. Make sure you remain in the driving seat and don't become a slave to money.
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    Oct 23 2013: Here is a short article that might interest you, written by a well known author of novels and screen plays: http://www.stevenpressfield.com/2013/10/writing-and-money-part-2/

    He argues that money buys him time and time buys him the ability to do what he loves to do.
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    Oct 23 2013: Yes, for mammonists.:)
    • W T 100+

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      Oct 24 2013: Oooh, I learned a new word.

      How come your vocabulary is so rich Yoka?
      I am very impressed.
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        Oct 24 2013: o_OYeah~ V!This one is from the dictionary.hehehe......
  • Oct 22 2013: Alex Torres
    Oviedo, FL
    United States

    Starting at age 9 with an early morning paper route, I stayed employed somewhere until age 29.
    I used the money for bicycles and goodies, and helped my mom, and later, I had all the boy toys;
    girls, cars, alcohol, but never drugs. The ambition bug bit deep into my soul at age 29. There is
    no feeling like that of ambition. It's seeing the light at the end of the tunnel, and it never ends.
    I still have it, but circumstances of poor health have limited my activities. At age 29, I decided
    that I would never work for anyone again. I would make my way by myself. I went home and
    told my wife exactly that. She just gave me a look, and said, "You better make a lot of money!".
    So, I did.

    I retired at age 39. Since then I've had 10 or 11 businesses. The damned ambition bug just
    won't go away.

    Now, I Handicap Horse Races to get the winners, in the evenings, with my buddy, by phone.
    I've spent 20 years developing a computer program to do the handicapping but fear the NSA
    has stolen it with their dastardly dealings through Microsoft. In the mornings I research the NSA,
    and blog about their nasty actions in several newspapers. Afternoons are spent teaching 3,& 4
    cushion bank shots to other elderly criminal-type snooker players at the local Senior Center.
    We play well.

    I would chase women, but I cannot remember why...
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    Oct 22 2013: Hi Alex,

    happiness, satisfaction and sense of Completion is different to each and every individual, money is one of the form for sometime; but not always, time teaches you everything Sooner or later.
  • Oct 22 2013: Once the basic needs are met, you don't need money to be happy.
    Alex here is the one liner - the moment we stop comparison - comparing ourselves with others, happiness flows in ( which doesn't mean you should remain contented with what you have or are, just follow your heart )
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    Oct 22 2013: No.....a smile on a baby face does not need any money
  • Oct 22 2013: In reality Money comes first and in Philosophy ,Dreams and Fantasy money comes last. Money buys you everything , even Love . Money is the means not an end. Some people seem to reach happiness,satisfaction or sense of completion in other ways there may be many factors responsible to it. The special some one gives you the sense of completion only when you have the money. Just say to your special someone that we will together live in a small hut without any luxury and then see what happens.Every thing is Illusion .
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    Oct 22 2013: Hi Alex,
    Living the life adventure joyfully, with integrity, curiosity, being all that I can be, learning all that I can, and contributing to the whole of humanity while being totally present with the life exploration in each and every moment creates happiness, contentment and sense of completion....flow:>)
  • Timo X

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    Oct 22 2013: I can recommend the book Flow by Mihály Csíkszentmihályi, which is exactly about this subject. You can check Wikipedia for an overview: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flow_(psychology).
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    Oct 22 2013: Money is the element part of happiness .But people oneself drive the direction for feel good or bad with version and understanding of lives .The drug and the alcohol problem main reason is not the money is the people feeling about the world and society ,
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    Oct 22 2013: it is supposed to be a serious question, or you have some agenda?

    tell me that you can not imagine a single thing that costs nothing and gives you satisfaction. i dare you to say that.
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      Oct 22 2013: kinda feels like the first challenge to me.

      We don't all start from a stance of long knowledge - and .. gotta start somewhere.

      Let's just pretend for a moment that Alex is just getting kicked-off here.

      If that's the case .. what would you say?
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      Oct 22 2013: Alex is a high school student.
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        Oct 22 2013: and he is so rich, never does anything fun without a bucket of dollar bills? :)
        • Oct 22 2013: Hey, just a question. I just wanted to know what others did, because so many people complain, saying that their life is horrible. It's the simple things that can make one happy/
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          Oct 22 2013: I was responding to your asking whether he had an agenda. Kids don't ask questions like this, typically, with an agenda.
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          Oct 22 2013: You are right Alex, my young wise friend....a lot of people complain, and you might notice that some rich people complain as well. This gives us a clue that perhaps money and happiness are not necessarily connected. I totally agree...it's the simple things that can make one happy!

          I saw a great sign on my travels today...
          "Be kind to everyone....no exceptions"
  • Oct 22 2013: There is more than one imput It is a product function. The items you need have to be there in satisfactory amounts.
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    Oct 22 2013: it depends the goals ,it can be the kill makes tyrannical peoples feel happy with it (the limit of the bad),it can be your soulmate ,it can be a principals ,the power like it can be a moment can enrich your life forever...
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    Oct 22 2013: You might enjoy the Martin Seligman talk on positive psychology. He shares what his research shows about the primary correlates of happiness or satisfaction. The number one factor is feeling good about ones social interactions with the people with whom one associates. Other important factors are meaningful work, or the opportunity to contribute, and the opportunity to learn by rising to a challenge.

    The research on the role of income typically shows that within a country there is a threshold level of income above which further income does not increase contentment or happiness. That level covers subsistence needs plus a little extra.
    • Oct 22 2013: Yes, I watched it and it was great, very funny also!