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The similarity between computer repair and medicine

As a pc repair technician, I am exposed to thousands of different computer issues each year. Over the past few months, as new viruses develop and old ones grow more complicated, I have notived a striking similarity between the methods and approaches used to "treat" the infected computer.

Even the terms, "virus" and "infection" have a biological connotation that is more than coincidental. So, if the terms, and even approaches to resolving computer issues are similar to problems faced in the medical field, why couldnt research into how computer viruses grow and operate lead to medical advances?

The best example I have is the Conduit virus. I first encountered it back in February of 2013, on a pc that was running so slowly there was no question that it was a virus. The traditional scans and other means of detecting viruses at that time showed no indication that there was an infection. By going back and looking for the symptoms, I was able to diagnose the culprit, which happened to be a simple executable that had recently been installed. It was downloading and installing other programs, and once the process of removing it was started, it fought back, mostly by locking up the computer, but also by installing programs that altered our ability to remove the virus.

The entire thing held for me the connotation that there is a possible link between biological and electronic infections that might be more than just topical.

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    Oct 17 2013: Good idea, that yours. And, why not enlarge its range? Let's watch the topic on a wider view: Not only about 'deseases' but adding similarities between human brain and computer systems for ' thinking '.. I've heard there are many (and expertise) people working at that. I'm convinced sooner than later, computers will think and react very similarly to our own 'supercomputer'. Amazing field to research.

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