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  • R H
  • Chicago, IL
  • United States

TEDCRED 30+

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How is it possible that God is 'Love'?

Everything in the natural world, or even the known universe, is competitive. Kill or be killed. Eat or be eaten. Human's most successful means of progress is competition. Win or lose. Succeed or get left behind. Do or die. Even stars and planets are created by violent fusion. Only the strong and competent - in any system - survive. Yet, we 'believe' that God is 'Love'. But where in the natural world is 'love'? Where in the universe is this love? Since we cannot 'see' it or identify it outside of human experience, and if it exists, where is it? Surely if God is Love, then His/Her creation should reflect it, shouldn't it? But all I see is violence. The wolf kills the deer. The bear kills the fish. The croc eats the human. The virus attacks the cell. The star explodes. Why have all of the major religions concluded that God is love? It seems obvious that God is not love, but God is 'Survival', or God is 'Violence', or God is 'Victory'. Because if God were love, then everything would be lovers, and the animals would commune, and the planets would 'birth', and our human problems would be centered around getting something done and getting out of bed because we'd be too busy loving each other - not killing each other. So, how is it possible that God is 'Love'?

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    Oct 11 2013: I must certainly say I agree with Mary M. Can you not enjoy life? Is your life a constant struggle for superiority? Each day there are thousands of things one can enjoy, just like Mary says. It can be the starry skies, but also the everyday activities. Do you not feel good after doing something? That's a mark that if someone/thing created this universe it must have had at least a bit of compassion for us.

    Let's just consider humans. If no one would love anyone else, we would have soon died out. Have you ever heard of the Maslow's hierarchy of needs? He recognized, that after fulfilling his own basic needs a human experiences a need for sharing with others to be happy.

    You may see a wolf that kills other animals to survive. You do not see that in today's human world, one can achieve far more by giving and being given, than on his own. One takes everything to survive alone, then one is left alone. If one collects a treasure for oneself, earlier or later one will lose it, and there will be nothing left.

    It is true we do not love everybody. Most often we prefer to love the people who can love us. But humanity achieves more together than individually.
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      R H 30+

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      Oct 12 2013: Hi Franciszek. Thanks for responding. Please see my response to Mary.
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        Oct 12 2013: You are very observant. There are two examples of love or something of that kind in the animal(actually insect) world which I can give you:
        1. Spiders- after copulating, the female spider(which is bigger than the male) eats the male. Why? There multiple hypothesis, but it is mostly considered as a sort of self-sacrifice in order to ensure his offspring is born and can survive. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spider_cannibalism
        2. Bees- to sting someone, a bee needs to sacrifice its own life. As a result, it dies for the sake of the beehive and bee-community.

        Both of these are clear signs, that the organism does not consider itself as an individual to be the most important, but exhibits a consciousness that it is a part of a bigger "organism"/community. In similar ways, humans by "sacrificing" their lives (loving others) become a part of something bigger than themselves.
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          R H 30+

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          Oct 13 2013: Now that is very interesting. In this lies the 'interpretive crux' for me: Is the creature 'self-sacrificing', or is it following a decisive method of reproduction and/or species continuation chosen by random evolution processes - similar to the various hominids that existed before home sapiens? In other words, are those species simply on a 'delayed' path of 'chosen successful species for survival' not yet realized in their fullness? Even so, is not this display that you cite more evidence of the inherent violence of God? If I 'sacrifice' myself to death for the good of the species (humanity), how is their 'love' for me? My 'love' therefore, becomes self-immolation. I must 'destroy' myself to achieve love. I see a contradiction in terms here. But thank you very much for your thought provoking responses.

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