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What is the difference between happiness and satisfaction?

As I wonder every time about the philosophy of life, the question that make me think again and again that a man having satisfaction of particular thing is a happy? or can happy man considered as fully satisfied? Or happiness and satisfaction are the two sides of coins?

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    Oct 12 2013: Satisfaction is when you have the answer of your question. Happiness is when you have no more questions.
    • Y Li

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      Oct 14 2013: Dear Pabitra, I like your brief reply to that question very much, but would like to clarify it if you don't mind:
      Satisfaction is when you have the solution to your problem. Happiness is when you have no more problems, temporarily of course.
      Because the answer to one's question may not satisfy one, while humans are curious and always have questions which may not make them unhappy. On the other hand, problems do make humans unsatisfied and unhappy.
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        Oct 15 2013: Dear Y Li,
        Thanks. Happiness comes after asking many questions, whether or not one gets all the answers is immaterial. Happiness comes when human mind realizes that its natural make up is one of curiosity and inquisitiveness and its natural tendency is to seek solutions of problems. With that realization the mind makes peace with its own restlessness and starts to love the grand drama of life without any more question. That's how one becomes happy I guess. Funnily, at this stage one bothers little about happiness :)
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      Oct 15 2013: So, why have questions?.. Good question, huh?
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      Oct 15 2013: Does this mean that peope who do not have questions, ambitions, or desires are happy?

      I have a son in elementary school. He is rarely upset by anything or anyone. Teachers and peers love him - he is never aggressive. He causes no trouble. He rarely shows desire to join games with other children or to play with toys other kids play with. He rarely asks questions. He seems to be always happy...

      He has autism. He can lay on his back on the floor for hours happily watching a spinning wheel on a toy. This is the primary source of sorrow and worry in our family. We feel sorry for him and worry that he will be very unhappy when he grows up, different from other people. He often puts on clothes inside-out, often cannot match buttons to the holes on his shirt. We worry that he will not be able to take care of himself when he grows up.

      But... he is NEVER upset by any of this! Really, why is putting on a shirt or socks inside out such a big deal? Whose problem is it? His or ours? Are we sorry for him or for ourselves? Shall we strive to help him have desires and ambitions, like other people? Or shall we "accept reality" as is and focus on our own happiness instead?

      Can you call unhappy a person who is unaware of his unhappiness?

      For me, this is the point when I realize that I ask too many questions to which there are no answers. Therefore, there is no sense even asking these questions. "Funnily, at this stage one bothers little about happiness :)" Now, that I realize all of this, am I happy? This one last standing question ruins my enlightenment. But, funnily, I don't care much about this philosophy. There is enough stuff to care about.

      The question "am I englightened yet?" is funny. If I ask it, then, obviously, not.
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        Oct 16 2013: Dear Arkady,

        I shall attempt to reply to your comment in two parts, hoping you will not necessarily make any connection between the parts, other than what is intended.

        First, I strongly believe Autism is not a disorder, it is a difference. There is no primacy of the social and educational learning order we have created. An autistic child’s brain processes information differently from others in the context of defined learning. The pervasive silliness to define happiness and fulfillment in life makes it more difficult for them.

        Second, in my opinion being unaware of happiness is true and lasting happiness. That you do not care about the philosophy and feel that there is enough stuff to care about is a perfect philosophical stand.

        The happiness that I am talking about happens when a mind stops asking questions not because there is no sense in asking them but there is more sense in not asking them. That leaves one’s mind with time and space for contemplation.

        “Does this mean that people who do not have questions, ambitions, or desires are happy?”

        Yes they are but only after asking many questions, having many ambitions or desires. If you have time you can check Mani Lal Bhaumik out and read his book, ‘Code Name : God’.
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          Oct 16 2013: Thanks. I agree with what you say. Not because it is true or makes sense. Much of philosophy is not about truth - it's about point of view. Two people may look at the same thing and have radically different perceptions, both true, correct, and reasonable in their own way. I noticed that most arguments about philosophy and religion are of this nature. So, when I say that I agree, it simply means that we perceive these issues similarly.

          Re: "The happiness that I am talking about happens when a mind stops asking questions not because there is no sense in asking them but there is more sense in not asking them. That leaves one’s mind with time and space for contemplation."

          IMO, it makes sense to ask philosophical questions, but most of them have no sensible answer. They are not for answering, but for contemplation. They are, usually, multifaceted. The goal is to see as many facets as possible. When one thinks he has an answer to a philosophical question, it means he sees only one facet. Perhaps, it's better to say, "there is more sense in not answering them".
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        Oct 16 2013: Yes it is better to say: there is more sense in not answering them. We are almost in the same page Arkady, certainly in the same chapter. Cheers! :)

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