TED Conversations

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Why do you come to TED conversations?

I have a secret to confess.

I have become increasingly addicted to TED talks. And only very recently have I discovered TED conversations, it's great.

Then I started reflecting- why do I do this? To get inspiration? To express my opinions or get comfort from recognition? To help people?
I hope my true intention is to want to learn new things.

So I'm curious and want to throw the question to the floor- Why do YOU leave comments at conversations?

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    Oct 22 2013: great talk about asking for help..is this how the Ted staff feel? I have no problem asking or giving help...but the process for rejecting talks is robotic and does not imply negotiating for a better choice or way to fit it into a Ted format...I could be wrong and Ive missed the warmth of it all...why cant Ted Staff comment as to what and why comments are rejected and invite us to re apply...should I ASK?
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      Oct 23 2013: I cannot tell you how TED staff feel, but whenever I have had an email exchange with someone on the staff, it hasn't been "robotic" at all.

      When a comment of mine has been deleted, I have received the "form letter" response that fits the case. For example, "Your comment has been deleted because the comment to which you responded was deleted." That seems an effective way of conveying that message.

      I have a feeling the staff gets lots and lots of email, so one would need to be patient about getting a response. An option you could consider, at least, is to run your thread idea by another pair of eyes than your own- someone who successfully starts lots of threads.

      I don't want to suggest anyone in particular, but you can consider it. Someone in the community is not getting as many personal emails as the TED staff and might be able to give help faster.

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