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Rebecca Kaplan

STEM Coordinator, Fraser Woods Montessori School

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Educating students about how their neurobiology impacts the way they feel can improve lives.

At a time in their lives where changes in their bodies often seem completely beyond their own control, teaching them techniques to manage their feelings (and therefore their destiny!) will change their lives.From experience, kids are very interested in how their own bodies and minds work, although life can seem very puzzling or challenging to them. Teaching them to recognize patterns in their feelings or behaviors that might just NOT be related to their character, but instead their physiology, is empowering in a way that is captivating to students.

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  • Da Way

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    Oct 6 2013: This is an excellent idea and would like to point out it should not be limited for just kids, many adults need this kind of education too!
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      Oct 10 2013: I completely agree. Much of the information I learned about how to consciously and deliberately affect my impact on the world I learned in the last 6 years or so, and I'm definitely a grownup. I agree with what Frank Bierbrauer said about "awareness of self". I am much more self-aware now than 6 years ago.

      With my middle school students, though, many of them have the capability of being more self aware than they are, but are still operating very unconsciously in a reactive/reflexive way. Using the Amy Cuddy talk was a great way to start a conversation about being aware of the difference between your feelings and what is actually happening.

      I talk to my own young children that way, too. When my youngest is working himself up into a tantrum, sometimes (not always) it can work to draw his attention to the fact that "just because you are crying doesn't mean something bad actually happened to you--you might just be sad or hungry, or tired."

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