TED Conversations

edward long

Association of Old Crows

TEDCRED 100+

This conversation is closed.

Teachers should get tough.

In the recent WSJ Saturday Essay Joanne Lipman broaches a controversial idea for improving public education. To prompt you to read her essay here are her talking points: 1) A little pain is good for you. 2) Drill baby, drill. 3)Failure is an option. 4) Strict is better than nice. 5) Creativity can be learned. 6) Grit trumps talent. 7) Praise makes you weak. 8) Stress makes you strong.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304213904579095303368899132.html?mod=trending_now_1

Share:

Showing single comment thread. View the full conversation.

  • thumb
    Oct 1 2013: I am totally for the idea, however, once the legislation is passed. It will probably start breaking down as soon as it begins.

    The writer has experienced, understood the reasons why it would be a good method, but that doesn't mean the other teachers, having the method forced down their throats, would understand why would this be recommended, or may fail to perform to an adequate level to bring out the essence of this method.

    The teacher is tasked to restraint themselves [Failure is an option] and push the students.

    Does every single teacher understand the applications for both, the stress and encouragement, and to bring both to a reasonable extent, where somehow all the students in the class is able to excel? i highly doubt so.
    • thumb
      Oct 1 2013: Looking forward, with our eye on the prize (improved public education) these kinds of ideas seem attainable. Looking back, and remembering how the system typically works zaps all enthusiasm for betterment. Your words are true. What if we don't look back? What if we escape the confines of the box? Doesn't every employer have a right to dictate what methods will be used by employees in the company? Why should the business of education be any different? Of course teachers must have liberty in non-essentials, but such issues as are mentioned in the essay ought to be mandatory policy dictated by management and part of the core beliefs of the whole team. Anyone in violation should be subject to discipline. Tough goes all the way up.
      • thumb
        Oct 2 2013: Doesn't every employer have a right to dictate what methods will be used by employees in the company? Why should the business of education be any different?

        Because your employees are dealing with children. Some of the children need a more unique form of teaching. Every child born unique learns differently, How could just a mere few methods able to accommodate everyone.

        Of course teachers must have liberty in non-essentials, but such issues as are mentioned in the essay ought to be mandatory policy dictated by management and part of the core beliefs of the whole team. Anyone in violation should be subject to discipline. Tough goes all the way up.

        And the so called "Corruption" sets in. Tough can only get so far, before complacency, shortcuts gets a vip seat.

        I'm also interested in knowing how you might suggest to enforce the rules. Cheers!
        • thumb
          Oct 2 2013: You seem to be saying that teachers must have carte blanche to set their own policies and procedures because they deal with children. I absolutely reject that premise. Teachers must follow the rules like anyone else. You are correct that no mere few methods can suffice to operate a superior school. I doubt anyone is advocating these 8 rules as the sum total of education policy. Why do you say toughness inevitably leads to corruption in the form of complacency? I do not see the connection. Thanks for your insight. Can you clarify?
      • thumb
        Oct 4 2013: I object to both carte blanche & rules [other then 4&7]

        I apologize, my version of "corruption" is learned from "Elite Squad", a film. In that show, "Corruption" is not political or have a right or wrong. It is failure to perform according to the rules/regulation. [E.g A guy has a 5 mins break, He should take off his boots to air his feet, but too lazy to do so/seems pointless to him.]
        It is those minor things that could just snowball till it becomes a culture in the school.

        To me nothing is more important than the dedication and interest of the teachers themselves.
        i feel rules could never contest motivation, encouragement and Education for the teachers.

        I also just noticed, when reading other comments, We probably would never come to an agreement because we live in different countries. At my end [motivation, encouragement and Education for the teachers] is a big deal. it would probably help my country.
        I have never seen how USA's education system works.

        I'm from Singapore, and to me, the education here is just clockwork. Teachers are more about teaching then their are just humans beings. It feels like every other students are just another number.
        This metallic way to teaching is the form of "corruption" i tried to refer to.
        • thumb
          Oct 4 2013: Absolutely agreed Dusty. The dedication and interest of teachers is the key here. It is probably my imagination, but I remember a time when only dedicated and interested folks became teachers. They were motivated to lead children out of darkness into knowledge. They devoted themselves to that task. Today there are many teachers who are not in it for the kids. As for global agreement on this debate, it is not a global problem so you are most likely right that we will not reach unanimous agreement here, and that's OK.

Showing single comment thread. View the full conversation.