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Why continue the "WAR on DRUGS"

It seems that far more people is being harmed and dies exactly because there is a tabboo and war going on and not actually because the drugs themselves is that harmful. Those that are could be made clean, people could know what they are taking.

Sick people(addicts) is being stressed out and jailed when they really need someone to care for them. There is war and weapons is being sold, people are murdered in the streets. Peoples lifes are being taken away for shipping drugs, or in some countries just for possesion, sentenced to life imprisonment. Drugs like Krokodil , and Meth is being home cooked

Instead of trying to understand the demand for cocaine, heroine , marijuana, exstacy, mushrooms. Government are only trying to enforce law,

While actually research of the benifits of some illegal substances is being proven.

I think it is about time that some of the world leaders stand up to realize that The War on Drugs has failed big time and a new approach must be taken.

What is your opinion?

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  • Da Way

    • +1
    Sep 30 2013: If you ignore the politics and laws for the moment and go back to the basic principle why drugs are banned/regulated, it comes down to mainly 2 things- addiction and the consequences of people's actions under the influence. (ignoring the magnitude of potencies also for now).

    If you argue they can potentially be bad, but don't want to ban them, the alternative is to do what we've done with alcohol. Make everything legal and punish the consequences accordingly. E.g. you're allowed to drink but if you drink-drive and cause an accident, you face severe punishment. And according to how much a substance can influence an individual, e.g. the class A,B,C system of drugs (not the perfect classification i know), the sentence you face will be matching. Would that work?
  • Comment deleted

    • Oct 3 2013: It is possible that psychedelic plants it is a natural nutrient, like food and sex. Something that we once would have found by use of our noses by instinct, like i heard some other animals also will chew and consume some plants to get "high". And maybe not by trial and error. But pure intuition.

      It is really hard to explain such experiences in words, to someone who has not been there
      And if you can not measure it, it does not exist. In the world of logic

      At the same time it can cause delusions, it might work for a while, one great delusions of our mind was not nesesarily caused by any substance use. Or perhaps it was, but once we create an idea and print it and make it hard
      Interest in reviewing if there might be other ways it makes it difficult cause you promissed and by that promise you where elected, it eats its own tail. That be christianity or democracy it does make evolution a bit slower.
  • Oct 2 2013: The war on drugs is an enormous failure. all drugs should be legal to consume and legitimized in the free market system. All criminal organizations thrive on outlawed products that have high demands. Governments should not outlaw crimes that only hurt those who consent in the use or act of a particular product. if corporations sold drugs, prostitution, and gambling they would do so cheaper and more efficiently then anyone else, ending all criminal orginizations
    • Oct 3 2013: Like you are saying we should have freedom and access to do whatever we want
      but do we need prostitution, "drugs" and gambling when we are truly free?
      • Oct 3 2013: no but thats a personal choice and i guarantee thoses demands wont go away. the most viable solution is to let people engage in those activities freely as companies manage the affairs legitimately while simultaneously ousting illegitimate enterprises who operate behind the scenes in societies where such practices are criminal.
  • Sep 30 2013: agreed - very similar to the prohibition against alcohol which failed. Not sure what should replace it. What have other nations tried? what worked? what did not work?
  • Sep 30 2013: I would be curious to see what are the "benefits" of some illegal substances. Taken in moderate amount as "prescribed by the doctors" may have been beneficial in cases where people suffer extreme pain. Even the medicinal benefits of marijuana are nebulous at best; having no concrete evidence disproving it having any beneficial effects does not prove it sufficiently has. The problem with drugs hinges on abuse as well. Take for any in the circumstance of being abused, I don't see any benefits out from that end. My real problem is with the seeming eventual legalization of controlled substances, why the war on drugs but for now I am hopeful that we do not end up in that path.

    As I was writing my comment, I came across this article. All I can say is I am shocked by the utter greed.
    http://www.ctvnews.ca/business/federal-government-launching-1-3-billion-free-market-in-medical-marijuana-1.1475644
    • Oct 3 2013: The illegal drug ibogaine is being used to threat heroine addicts, as well as alcoholism, tobacco and other addiction , in Canada, Netherlands, Mexico... and Portugal,
      It breaks down the craving of the addiction after 1-2 causes
      of intake. The legal medicine out there takes month to get over with ..
      MDMA is being used by war veterans and police officers to deal with Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome,

      Why exactly do you have a problem with "seeming eventual legalization of controlled substances"?

      Thanks for you input
      • Oct 4 2013: Anecdotes are often misleading and there are strict regulations with regard to approving a said substance if we are to say that such a substance has certain medicinal benefits; a drug needs to go through extensive clinical trials to be sure that there are no side effects and that they perform as said. The drug is not approved in Canada but it is not banned either. From where people are getting them and demand from a certain population, i.e. pot heads, might have fueled the decision to ban it.

        I have to say that I am guilty of popular belief; my comment regarding the "seeming eventual legalization of controlled substances" refer more to substances like marijuana, which people are driving to legalize it but just seem like a bad idea to a citizen like me.
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    Sep 30 2013: why continue? because it brings you votes. it is the logic of democracy. if you run for an office, you need to say what people want to hear. whether it is lie or truth, it does not matter. at the end, if you have more votes than the other candidate, you did well. the question could be asked, why war on drugs give you votes? why people vote for such an immoral and destructive institution? that's a good question.
    • thumb
      Oct 1 2013: Lie or truth does matter in the logic of democracy, in fact, it is part of its very foundation.

      Concluding from a rotten implementation of a system allows to draft for improvements, yet does not reveal its original logic.

      Could you think of any improvement for applied democracy for your observations to be rendered 'history' in the future?
  • Sep 30 2013: Sadly, drugs not only profit criminals. In some cases they also profit some governments and many, many organizations. The sale and revenue of weapons and transportation, aircraft, equipment, supplies, etc. is much needed by manufacturers and government contractors to keep profits coming. Dirty cops also corrupt anti-drug officials are filling up their pockets with cash and benefits so no one wants to stop this "war". There's always profit and who is paying all this? CONSUMERS. Drug "highways" or distribution paths from origin to destination sure have a toll of hundreds of deaths, so it's a product that has in certain way "carried" out lives on the way.
    Not only they are over-paying the price for addiction, but people are making a profit using their addiction to drugs.
    Drugs should be legalized, but with licensing and certification for labs to produce it. It can become be a free market for drugs, there will be taxation (transparent revenue for the nations) and there will be at least one less reason for corruption. There could be official /professional labs developing drugs and there will be competition. People will not be taking those drugs made in who knows what conditions and even mixed with cheap stuff, which can kill consumers even faster. Think about the immense amount of sugar Coca Cola is practically stuffing into people's body daily. It won't be as dangerous as drugs but in the long term, check out the consequences. It still kills. If people are aware of the dangers, just don't consume it.
  • Sep 30 2013: For a start, I'd say that a distinction needs to be made between the drugs that are around the same level as tobacco, and the hard stuff that can put you down for the count. Marijuana and heroin shouldn't belong in the same category, for example.

    In general, I consider any declaration of war on a concept as idiotic. How do you know when you're done? What exactly is your objective, to kill an idea? Its a futile effort combined with a blank check, a great way of wasting everyone's time and resources because you're acting without a plan or end goal.
    I'm not saying we should legalize all the drugs tomorrow, but when setting out to do something, its important to have an objective you're driving towards. Otherwise, you just loose focus and the effort fizzles out.

    The first step in fixing this problem is to redefine this entire war. Less along the lines of "abolish drugs as a concept" and more of "contain them as much as realistic through education, economic reform, and without throwing millions of people in jail for minor offenses".

    Legalizing the lighter drugs may also help. I don't much like the concept, but that way, at least you have taxation, regulation, and a source of funding for criminals cut off. Sort of like the compromise we have with alcohol and tobacco, whom are just as harmful as many of the lighter illegal drugs.
    Its all about realistic expectations, and a well defined goal, something the current effort is sorely lacking in.
  • Sep 30 2013: Consider what you are not thingking right now. Which drugs?