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How can Kenya rapidly build an open source alliance to address human security? #WestgateAttack

Many people including multinationals have lost their lives in the ongoing #WestgateAttack. How can countries such as Kenya rapidly build private-public alliances to prevent senseless violence?

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    Sep 29 2013: It is such a hard core topic that, even many pages will be less to write about it. I believe the time is coming when we have to choose you want peaceful life, or you want life chasing for power,money, religion oriented etc
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    Sep 26 2013: The Islamic extremist group that killed scores of people at a Nairobi mall has now attacked two Kenyan towns near the Somali border. The leader of the Somali group al-Shabab (affiliated with Al Qaeda) said the attacks will continue.

    Knowing the above I must ask you how can anyone deal with a radical religious militant group. There is no middle ground .. you do as they want and say or you and many others must die. They often start talks with killings to influence the negotiations.

    The people being killed and the property being destroyed often have nothing to do with the cause .... the group simply does it to send a message. If they are non-believers who cares ... if they are believers they are martyrs to the cause. If they die they die for the cause in the name of Allah and be rewarded.

    You claim this is senseless violence .... senseless I agree but it serves a very real purpose. Fear.

    As most of these cells are independent, intell gathering is very hard. The best you can hope for is that they will be spotted and reported and if lucky intercepted and stopped. That is also highly unlikely. They will be sheltered, fed, armed, and briefed by sympathizers within the country.

    This is not a game or war with rules played by civilized people. This is I want it my way and will kill everyone I can until I die.

    I have stated my view ... please advise me of how your suggestion of a open source alliance would work.

    Thank you. Bob.
    • Sep 29 2013: Hi Bob,
      I agree with you that human security is a complex problem. This is the reason we need to create alliances with the private and public sector to solve human security.

      The Westgate attack deeply affected my life. Several people who are close to me were inside when the terrorists invaded the mall. Fortunately, they were all rescued. The terrorists want to instill fear in us but we cannot let them triumph.

      Here is what what we know. The mall attack in Kenya required synchronized planning by well funded and well organized groups. This incident was planned to be a spectacular attack to gain global attention.

      The conventional way of gathering security details is not effective in Kenya and other vulnerable countries. Given the capacity challenges with the public sector, civilians cannot solely depend on the government to solve these complex security issues.

      Thick Nhat Hahn, a monk and global peace activist, made the following remarkable quote on the current state of the world. "The way we live our daily lives is what most effects the situation of the world. If we can change our daily lives, then we can change our governments and can change the world."

      As global citizens in the public and private sector, we must form strategic alliances and collaborate with one another to combat the escalated threat to our humanity.

      I don't know how an open source alliance on human security would work. But I think the first step is to get enough people who believe in this cause and are willing to rally behind this movement and come up with a new approach to fight terrorism that is effective in vulnerable nations such as Kenya.
  • Sep 24 2013: Stopping these sorts of things is mostly about good intelligence (potentially in cooperation with other countries) and rapid armed response.

    Both require secrecy, which makes open source something of a bad idea. There is quite a difference between sharing knowledge between intelligence agencies and making this sort of thing available to all.
    • Sep 29 2013: Hi Nadav,

      Here is what what we know. The mall attack in Kenya required synchronized planning by well funded and well organized groups. This incident was planned to be a spectacular attack to gain global attention.

      The conventional way of gathering security details is not effective in Kenya and other vulnerable countries. Given the capacity challenges in the public sector, civilians cannot solely depend on the government to solve these complex security issues.

      Thick Nhat Hahn, a monk and global peace activist, made the following remarkable quote on the current state of the world. "The way we live our daily lives is what most effects the situation of the world. If we can change our daily lives, then we can change our governments and can change the world."

      As global citizens in the public and private sector, we must form strategic alliances and collaborate with one another to combat the escalated threat to our humanity.

      I don't know how an open source alliance on human security would work. But I think the first step is to get enough people who believe in this cause and are willing to rally behind this movement and come up with a new approach to fight terrorism that is effective in vulnerable nations such as Kenya.
      • Sep 29 2013: Going for an open source, semi-civilian system is a complete waste of resources to be perfectly honest. It'll leak like a sieve, and intel you have that the terrorists know you have is worse than useless.

        As an Israeli, I live in a terrorist hot spot myself. I can tell you from experience that the only way you'll be stopping terrorist attack is via a combination of intelligence gathering and armed force. Both require a great deal of secrecy, and the ability to project military might.
        In essence, the government's job. Security services are the last thing you want to privatize or turn into public enterprises.

        The conventional methods of intelligence gathering all work very well. Its just a matter of applying them properly, and learning to accept the fact that like everything in life, there is no guaranty of success.
        The recent attack in Kenya is not a failure of the traditional methods. Its a failure of the application of the traditional methods by Kenyan authorities.