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Kumāra Bhikkhu

Buddhist Monk, Sāsanārakkha Buddhist Sanctuary

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Are you happier while at the computer, or while taking a walk?

By "taking a walk", I do mean taking a walk, even if just for a short while; not walking while engaging with a smart device. So, what's your experience?

P.S.: Just in case some of you misunderstand, the question is not meant so that we choose one over the other. (We do both anyhow, don't we?) It's not even so that we decide which one is better. It's about self-discovery. What's true for you? If you like to take it further, asking why would be great.

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    Sep 28 2013: Thanks to all who joined this conversation. Happy to see some of you give clear, direct answers (which I believe would help you in some ways). Some however skirted the question, and just philosophized instead. I'm thinking: Isn't examining the reality of your experience more valuable than mere philosophy?

    I'm reminded by these words by Socrates (or maybe Plato): Life unexamined is not worth living. Might sound a bit harsh to some. I love it though.
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      Sep 28 2013: Dear Kumāra,
      I am curious again....always.....all ways:>)

      Are you judging comments? Is this a test?
      You write... "Some of you give clear, direct answers (which I believe would help you in some ways). Some however skirted the question, and just philosophized instead. I'm thinking: Isn't examining the reality of your experience more valuable than mere philosophy?"

      Perhaps people examine their/our life experiences in different ways? Perhaps philosophizing is one way for some people to get in touch with their/our own thoughts, feelings, ideas, and perceptions? Are you suggesting that one way of examining life experiences is more or less valuable than another way of examining life experiences?
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        Sep 29 2013: Why not? Would thinking about how a leaf would feel like be as good as experiencing it by touching?

        Nothing wrong about philosophizing, of course. It's how we use it. Some use it as an avoidance strategy, mostly without being conscious of it.
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          Sep 29 2013: Kumāra,
          Thinking about how a leaf might feel may be as good as experiencing it by touch. I have a pretty good imagination, a foundation of happiness/contentment, and we never know for sure how something may feel to another person.

          I agree that some people may use philosophizing as an avoidance strategy, and some may use it as a way to get in touch with their honest, deeper feelings. We don't know, for sure what is going on in the heart and mind of others, unless they choose to share that information with us.

          To assume that some commenters on this thread use philosophizing to avoid the topic.....as you say..." Some however skirted the question", suggests that you may be avoiding looking at the question/answer in a different way?

          In my perception, if a person joins a conversation s/he is not trying to avoid anything, and can maybe offer a different perspective:>)
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        Sep 30 2013: That's possible.
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      Sep 28 2013: Kumara my friend,

      Are you looking for an answer you have in mind? In TED, people who just answer a question without looking at it in a unique way, are rare :)
      TED is a huge repository of brilliant insights, most of which comes from people who more than answer a question.
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        Sep 29 2013: Thanks for asking that. No, not any particular answer. And actually I do wish that people would answer the question while looking at it in a unique way--even if it's just to themselves (which some apparently did, as all they did was to give the question a thumbs up). Some however never answered it.
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          Sep 29 2013: You are heartily welcome in TED :) We wish to learn from from your insights too.

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