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To what extent do the ends justify the means?

Fairly straight forward question, I think. I encourage you to ask for clarification though. One possible "end" that you could talk about the means for is science (touched on in the Milgram experiment). How far should our experiments go before we can justify the knowledge of the results? You can definitely use your own examples; that was just a possible route.

Possible routes:
Means: torturing someone; Ends: information for national security

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  • Sep 28 2013: Phenomenologically speaking, any means is but a series of ends. Suppose for state of the universe A(end), one must go through A1, A2, A3,....A(end-1), where A1, A2, A3,....A(end-1) represent the current state universe at each infinitely small point in time. The original questions can now be rephrased as to what extent A(end) justify {A1, A2, A3,.....A(end-1)}. Now the tricky part is in the word 'justify'. If justify is used in the sense of giving reason or validation, then A(end) always justifies {A1, A2, A3,....A(end-1)}. But if justify is used in the sense of giving justice, then this becomes a moral question which can have limitless number of answers in a pluralistic society.

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