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Martin Odber

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Can the shortage of doctors be solved using an adaptation of the third law of supply and demand?

The third law of supply and demand states "If demand remains unchanged and supply increases, a surplus occurs, leading to a lower equilibrium price."
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supply_and_demand )

If we increased the rate of new doctors entering medicine (using mechanisms such as but not limited to; subsidizing doctors education, further compartmentalizing aspects of health care etc ) until we reached a surplus state then would waiting times and the cost of healthcare go down accordingly?

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  • Sep 30 2013: Martin, it is easy to debate on this but would it serve our purpose? Choices made in a nation's development sometimes return as problems. The medical problem is no exception. If there were a perfect solution then it'd probably be passed on between nations and we' have no problems.

    Instead, we have to find new eyes to see beyond the only visibly options and find something that'll work. That is much easier said than done though. Do you know what has led to the rise in costs within your nation?
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      Sep 30 2013: "..we have to find new eyes to see beyond the only visibly options and find something that'll work. "

      Kent I commend you on your insightfulness and feel on this note you are blindingly correct. If what we are doing is not achieving what we set forth to do, then repeating it will only create ruts in the road and not advancement. We need to find and try new approaches to resolving our issues.

      One key thing I feel lends hope, is that we recognize there is an issue and consider solutions because if we seek them, eventually we will find them. Someone once told me that "everyone has a bias and that by recognizing we have one we take the first step in gaining the control needed to change it."

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