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Why does the Western world think democracy is a magical, catch all solution?

There seems to be this sort of prevalent attitude in the Western world that democracy is something of a catch all solution for all the world's political problems.

Now, lets just get this out of the way. This isn't some pro-autocracy/democracy is bad argument, I believe the system has many benefits. I'm not for one second disputing all the good its done in many countries. What I am claiming, is that there are situations where its not the right answer.

Take for example the recent revolution and election in Egypt. Dictator toppled, Muslim Brotherhood elected democratically, uses democratic tools to get rid of democracy, toppled by military. If it wasn't for the military, chances are Egypt would have been going down the road to being a theocracy right now.
The same happens whenever a country with a long standing tradition of politically active religious groups with a wide voting base. Any democratic election will lead to democracy being canceled in short order.

While I dislike using it as an example, it also can't be ignored that Hitler originally rose to power democratically. The same is true for many other dictators, of both religious and secular leanings. That's what happens when a democratic tradition simply isn't there.

Any transition to democracy, needs to be done carefully, and with the bare minimum force of arms. Its not something that can be rammed down people's throats, and there are simply situations where the political climate doesn't allow it work.

I'm trying to get some insight as to why the western world doesn't see that?

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  • Sep 5 2013: Democracy also needs to be beneficial to all. The crisis toward cost of living is putting government in the pockets of industry who are increasing the essential cost of housing, utilities and education. Rural students in Australia are turning away from university studies as of cost associated while more and more placements for national students go to local metro students. John Nash's game theory would make an awesome solution if someone could figure out the values to assign in this huge equation, maybe even a artificial neural network, and instill the government to cap essential cost of living in the private sector as to limit providers to charge at cost price, returning providers of essential living needs back to a government. Where is the commonwealth monarch and what are they doing to stop third world regression?

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