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How are students educated in schools in YOUR country, where you came from?

Each country has a different education system. In most of the Eastern countries, students are only forced to go to great universities, in spite of their careers and what they want to do in the future. Since I am a student in South Korea, I am forced to only get good scores on exams and surrounded with full of excessive competitions among students. The whole society forces us to go to a famous college and just to gain reputations.

However, many people detect that the current education system is on the wrong track; and although a lot of people stood up in order to reform it, not many significant changes have happened. So I am willing to make an organization to change the current education system and lead the students into the right way of future. Before I actually put it into practice, I really want to hear from all of you about what your countries' real purpose of education is and how students are educated in schools. It would help me learn about education systems from all around the world, from diversity of countries. I would certainly appreciate your participation!

When I was researching for education around the world, I came to a conclusion that every nation's education is deeply connected with different cultures and historical backgrounds. So if you know anything about your country's history or cultures related to education, I would greatly appreciate it.

P.S Since I am a middle school student and have assignments to complete, it would take sone time for me to answer your comments. If you don't mind, I might write you back little later.

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  • Sep 11 2013: I live in the States-the heartland to be exact-and while they're trying to make the education system better and get more kids to go to college, it's not working. I wouldn't call myself a genius, but I'm certainly not stupid, and if I could get through 8 (9th grade as of now) years of never studying, never trying on the test, and getting 100% on the standardized test to make up for all the failed ones, there's something wrong with it. I don't do anything in school anymore now that I realized all I need to do is pass a test at the end of each semester. It's ridiculous how we no longer go to school to learn (in the U.S at least) but to be labeled and turned into a statistic. The 12th years at my school basically live in a constant state of stress from trying to prepare for the SAT/ACTs, which aren't even a good measure of intelligence. Sorry for the kind of ranting, I feel really strongly about this topic.

    So how to make the education system better....Get rid of standardized test. We're not standard, therefore we shouldn't be forced to take standard test.
    Life skills class. I still don't know how to balance a checkbook, buy a house, and I've yet to figure out rent to own.
    Some classes are totally unnecessary. Yes, we need math, science, and language skills, and a basic understanding of history, but more emphasis should be put on things like philosophy, health, (not physical education, that's torture. Health as in how to detect diseases before it's too late and how to prevent them) and sex education (seriously, don't even get me started on this.)

    So that's all I got for now. I hope you found that somewhat helpful.
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      Sep 12 2013: Diana, I think you are right that for many students, end of year standardized tests in the US are really easy, because they are meant to test literacy rather than what specifically you learned that year. It is about whether you can understand what you read and do basic math. Do you actually have an end-of-year standardized test every year in high school? In my state there is none in high school, I believe, other than at 10th grade.

      The SAT/ACT were never meant to test intelligence and, of course, are not required by high schools. Colleges use them just to assess whether reading, writing, and math skills are good enough to do college work at their institution.

      If you are getting 100% on your standardized tests, you should be able to use the internet to learn about how to balance a checkbook, the basics of buying a house, and that sort of thing. The most important thing you can take from school is the skill to learn this stuff from sources available to you rather than to rely on teachers at school for everything.

      It is interesting that in your state schools don't teach health. In my state kids take health often, in grade school, in middle school, and in high school.

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