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Amy Winn

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What can we teach our children about marriage, using advice from our successes as well as our failures, to teach them how to be a good mate?

Why is it that with each passing generation of marriages, there is an increasing likelihood of failure? Why is it that our grand-parents and great grand-parents went through wars and the great depression, and stuck together? They had no cable, no interenet….so perhaps it is because they actually spoke to each other. In this “me” world, it seems that newlyweds don’t have patience, understanding, empathy and tolerance. These things are the necessary foundation of a good and long lasting marriage. Where have they gone? So my question to everyone, is how can we change this? What can we teach the next generation from our own experiences, good and bad, that may improve their chances of maintaining a long term happy marriage?

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  • Aug 14 2013: This is what has been lost as we have moved away from small communities and into large cities. The sense of community and the ability of the young to observe the modeling of those older than them. Yes, we can teach our children about marriage through our success and failures. But likely, they have all ready watched us and have learned much from what we have "taught" them.
    • Aug 15 2013: Everett, I love that you brought up the idea that kids, (as well as adults) can learn much from those older than them. However, I believe that this is true in big cities as well as small farms. I remember so many sayings and behaviors that my grandmother instilled in me. I try to imitate what I admired about her in my relationship. Her kindness, her sweetness, and putting her husband first. And you are correct in that I learned from watching. We need to remember that children watch everything. They learn from our examples, whether we intend it or not.

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