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Son Huynh

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Is it true that we do things mostly for our benefits?

I have stumbled across someone saying that "As human beings, everything we do is because of our own benefits. Even when we choose to help someone, we do it because the kind act brings us happiness."

To some extent it is true. What do you think about this point of view?

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    Jul 21 2013: I believe this is true for the most part. As a species we work together for not our own benefits but for altruistic reasons as well. We rely on consequentialism and humanism. If something won't turn out well for us, we typically won't do it, nor if it turns out for someone else. This is different however online and afar because they aren't physically there so we do not take them into account when striving for a beneficial approach. When physically alone, things are for your own goodwill.
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      Jul 22 2013: I'm not so sure that "if something won't turn out well for us, we typically don't do it."

      After all, what about smoking, fast-food diets, gambling, alcoholism, drug addictions, and many other behaviors that people typically engage that are scientifically proven not to turn out well for us?

      Your point about physical distance was very interesting. I would add to 'when physically alone' 'when nameless, faceless, or otherwise of unknown, untraceable identity.' Follow me? Your example of being online made me think about how people act so different being in cars or even pushing shopping carts. Isn't it a little unsettling how people being at even the slightest remove causes them to so much more self-centered?

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