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Daniel Early

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Stevenson points out we don't like discussing injustice in America, to what extent is the online response to his talk evidence of that?

Bryan Stevenson pointed out how we don't like to talk about our problems in America and I'm curious to what extent the online reception of his talk is evidence of that. Does the low number of views of his talk compared to some of those talks on technology and design (which happen to be two areas he mentioned we tend to focus on more) speak directly to our evasive manner towards concepts like injustice? Is it possible that the title of the talk puts people off and is that disinclination symptomatic of America's tendency as a nation to refrain from addressing such shocking injustice?

I was surprised to see his talk has garnered only 382 total comments so far, which is less than some of the videos I've watched today that have 1,000's of comments. And his talk has been posted for over a year.

Last point, if you had me watch 'David Gallo's: Underwater Astonishment' and 'Bryan Stevenson: We need to talk about an injustice.' And then told me that one had a million views, but the other had over eight million, and then asked me which one was the one discerning, open-minded, issue-facing, problem-discussing TED talk viewers watched eight times more than the other. I would have been wrong. But this could be comparing to apples to oranges, that occurs to me as I right this, but the possibility is there.

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      Jul 13 2013: Good point. It didn't occur to me people might fear being accused of discrimination and that it would be equally, or at least similarly, applicable conversations. I've felt that way myself sometimes. Over breakfast this morning I finished the fourth chapter of Kahneman's 'Thinking, Fast and Slow.' In his discussion of priming effects, he states: "You cannot know this from conscious experience, of course, but you must accept the alien idea that your actions and your emotions can be primed by events of what you are not even aware." I wonder how likely it is people don't consciously consider they are rejecting involvement "in a discussion that would challenge their opinions and might make them feel bad about something they have done," because they are primed to disassociate themselves from subjects like 'injustice' or 'race equality.' In other words, they don't fully realize themselves why they are avoiding 'a hot button,' but they are and it is a mental process mostly hidden to them. I'm new to TED, but when I reflect on my initial response to the suggested talks on the 'New to TED?' playlist, I had a preference for some over others based on the title alone, demonstrating some of the innate bias of my own, preferring things I'm interested in to things that are more important.
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          Jul 13 2013: Brene Brown's talk on vulnerability would be good to people carrying childhood complexes into adulthood in regards to shame.

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