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Can we start our children in school at an earlier age?

I started school when I was 6 years old. However, I have heard of kids in other countries starting school at age 4 or 5. We honestly did not learn much in those earlier ages but I feel like by the the time I was able to learn, I was not learning enough from school. I know there are many flaws in the American education system and nothing can be changed overnight but this is just an idea I had...

benefits:
1. Children will have a head start learning not just knowledge but growing with other children

2. Parents can go back to work sooner since a lot of mothers can't go back to work until their children are in school

cost:
1. higher expenses for the government
2. possible negative effects on children (being away from their parents at an earlier age?)

I'm not a pediatrician nor a mother so those with insights, please share how you feel about this?

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    Jul 10 2013: No.

    It's important that kids get the right stimulation and experiences in those crucial early developmental years but this is not for schools to deal with. This is when parents need to be there.

    It's not magic, there's no special formula to follow or, more importantly, no product you need to buy from toy companies for this. I would say some books, singing to the radio/TV, basic objects to play with, water-play, sand-pit and some stuff to climb up/slide down/crawl over,etc.
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      Jul 19 2013: Take them to museums, take them out in nature, take them on neighborhood walks, to the shops, and all that Scott is suggesting. But most important is to have conversations with them about what they are noticing and wondering about and how they are making sense of their experiences. Tell stories about it, encourage them to tell stories and retell stories. This is educating through life and you don't need special qualifications to facilitate that as a parent or an older sibling or an aunt or uncle or grandparent.

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