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Jong Chan Park

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Do Western and Eastern countries define “developed country” in a same way? If not, how they differ?

Also, since there are many different backgrounds of TEDsters, let's share each country's perspective on developed country.

In my case, I'm from South Korea, and we think developed country as a perfect idealistic world, where all aspects, such as economics, environment, culture, military power, crime rate, etc are all the best. Such country doesn't exist, but we tend to compare us with USA when we talk about military power, Norway in case of environment, France in case of fashion, Japan in case of robot technology and so on. We always pursue the best in the world in each aspect of component of advanced country. This approach to see advanced country has made us to work really hard, but also given us a huge burden in Korean's mind.

In Korea, people need to define what an advanced country is, in my opinion.

What about your country? I am curious to know how your view is different from mine.

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    Jul 10 2013: Give a look to this awesome talk of Robert F. Kennedy, focusing on the point that the development of a nation is not necessary related to its GDP, but should be measured by other factors.

    Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77IdKFqXbUY

    Transcript:

    "Too much and for too long, we seemed to have surrendered personal excellence and community values in the mere accumulation of material things. Our Gross National Product, now, is over $800 billion dollars a year, but that Gross National Product - if we judge the United States of America by that - that Gross National Product counts air pollution and cigarette advertising, and ambulances to clear our highways of carnage. It counts special locks for our doors and the jails for the people who break them. It counts the destruction of the redwood and the loss of our natural wonder in chaotic sprawl. It counts napalm and counts nuclear warheads and armored cars for the police to fight the riots in our cities. It counts Whitman's rifle and Speck's knife, and the television programs which glorify violence in order to sell toys to our children. Yet the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country, it measures everything in short, except that which makes life worthwhile. And it can tell us everything about America except why we are proud that we are Americans."

    Insipiring words.
    Despite the differeces we have among cultures, I would love this concept to take roots in my country too, Italy, and maybe lots of people would like the same, in their own ones.
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      Jul 13 2013: Guido, thanks for sharing the talk. I didn't know such understanding of a developed nation already came in Kennedy's time.
      Suddenly I got a question: when is the first time to start measuring development in a nation with the factors other then GDP?

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