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Kareem Fahim

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Are you comfortable with NSA collecting your personal data?

'Top secret PRISM program claims direct access to servers of firms including Google, Facebook and Apple'

The National Security Agency has obtained direct access to the systems of Google, Facebook, Apple and other US internet giants, according to a top secret document obtained by the Guardian.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/06/us-tech-giants-nsa-data

Well, all of us already knew so I don't think it has surprised anyone... but I'd like to know opinions of TED community, are you comfortable with fact that USA Gov. is continuously collecting your personal data?

@People who say 'nothing to hide, nothing to fear' http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_oAKtBpdZSw

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Closing Statement from Kareem Fahim

Majority of people are annoyed by this 'data collection'. Western Govs., defenders of 'freedom' 'democracy' and 'input_word' are mere bunch of hypocrites. Although it is shocking how some people are defending NSA and these faceless entities... (maybe they are 'trolls' or NSA paid users...).

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  • Jul 4 2013: Just like to make a few points about the situation:
    First, I don't think anyone can listen to everyone's conversations, the NSA may be good, but not that good. I don't think the NSA is interested in endless conversations with high points such as "what are we having for dinner, boy what a hard day at work, do you want to go to the movies tonight, etc, etc. I think the program scans/screens millions of calls and flags calls with "hot button" words or probably patterns of words that indicate some type of encryption or code. Since I'm not, nor is the majority of the U.S. population, involved in the sale of weapons of mass destruction or espionage, I'm not really concerned about phone calls being being benignly screened. If screening calls is going to prevent 911-like situations then I think its ok.
    Second, intelligence gathering goes on all day every day by all countries (and FYI by businesses), NO country can truly sit on their high horse and say they don't; spying in many senses helps keep the global peace, its just an unspoken global "accord"- this is just the world we live in.
    Third, (most importantly) don't blame the NSA, in many senses they're just doing their job. When we live in a time of unconventional warfare (i.e. 911) unconventional defenses must be put in place. Some say the CIA/NSA dropped the ball with 911 but for that one "failure" I'm sure there have been many more "unreported" victories.
    Fourth, Mr Snowden may have used "free speech" to express what he wanted but in the end I think his efforts have caused damage. Behind each covert operation there are usually agents (PEOPLE) who are being protected by the secrecy of the operation, who in this case may have been exposed. Mr Snowden has cast judgment on NSA for spying on "us" without our consent but I think he was also out of place for taking it upon himself for disclosing a covert operation and making a decision for "us" and the safety of our nation without our consent.
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      Jul 5 2013: Curious he V WILLIAMS on this point of yours......" Mr Snowden has cast judgment on NSA for spying on "us" without our consent but I think he was also out of place for taking it upon himself for disclosing a covert operation and making a decision for "us" and the safety of our nation without our consent."

      Are you perchance telling us that a democratically elected Govt (in your case America) has accordingly been given 'open slaver' and full consent be YOU the voter, to carry out whatever actions they like with out your consent or knowledge or accountability??

      Curious.............who's job and right is it to hold govts accountable??
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      Jul 7 2013: They can listen to all our conversations and they do! Although by monitoring this is real time our government may thwart a terrorist threat, the even larger value is that this data is always around. So five years from now when they are trying to track down the terrorist next store who happened to have dinner with you years ago, they may well pull up that phone call you had with your neighbor where he talked about his dislike for apple pie, and now, yes, that could help track down the apple-pie-hating terrorist.

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