TED Conversations

This conversation is closed. Start a new conversation
or join one »

Does your country have an Electronic Direct Democratic (E2D) party?

I'm curious to find TEDsters who know of, or are members of any E2D party that might exist in your home country.

I'd like to hear some of the success stories you've had and how the general implementation of the party is going.

I'd also really like to talk to and/or help anyone thinking of starting a new E2D party in a country.

In case you haven't heard of E2D (which most of you likely haven't) I'll provide a link to the manifesto here: http://e2d-international.org/manifesto/

+5
Share:

Showing single comment thread. View the full conversation.

  • thumb
    Jun 22 2013: Sven, you mentioned " laws making it illegal to force an elected representative to vote a certain way" Could you please be specific I would like to read these with a critical eye. I've once or twice read the elections canada laws and never noticed it.
    • Jun 23 2013: Sorry Martin I do not have specific examples, I remember someone mentioning it, each country will be different. I am assuming there is a law that it is illegal to coerce an elected representative to vote a certain way, perhaps targeted at corruption but if a DD party put in writing, signed by a candidate, that they have to vote according to the majority, opponents might contest it as coercion, or the contract could be considered void on this basis if the candidate went rogue.

      It does not really matter for DD parties, they would like to have a legal commitment from each candidate to adhere to the majority vote but the candidate could still do their own thing, raising the issue as a contract breach through the legal system would not undo the votes that candidate made, so a certain level of trust is needed, and oversight, next election cycle they would be kicked out.


      There are many laws that have to be adhered to, in many locations a limited number of supporters, or dues paying members of the party, are needed before a party can be put on the ticket, so like any political party a DD party has a lot of canvassing and convincing to do before they can even be considered a valid party
      • thumb
        Jun 23 2013: I will be seeking any and all obstacles to success and the more things I am aware of, the better so I appreciate your insights into these matters.

        I did find one particular comment amusing and beg you to forgive me. You had suggested "t if a DD party put in writing, signed by a candidate, that they have to vote according to the majority, opponents might contest it as coercion"

        The reason I found it amusing is that it is expected that those we elect to represent us do just that, represent us, not themselves. Yet this might be seen as coercion?

        Possible, but I suspect that which ever party reacts in this manner will be seen dis-favorably by constituents, and those parties which embrace the concept, more favorably.

        Who can say? Time will tell.

Showing single comment thread. View the full conversation.