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Casey Kitchel

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Political parties should be banned in the United States of America.

In George Washington's 1796 Farewell Address, President Washington warned the American people of the dangers political parties pose to the nation's government (that of the United States under the Constitution). Considering the current government's stalemate and the abilities of political parties to “divide a nation”, it seems most evident that he was right in expressing his concerns for the future of this country and for the welfare of its people.

As it appears, elected officials are more concerned with maintaining their own party's control over their rivals rather than serving the interests of the people and opens up the debate on whether political parties should continue to dominate politics in the United States of America at the expense of the American people and at the expense of a functioning government.

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  • Jun 9 2013: Politicians and political parties have turned their priorities upside down, creating new American aristocracies (which our founding fathers sought to escape), to the detriment of our middle and lower socioeconomic classes. This is the way I feel their priorities should be:

    1. Our country and its people – “We the people,” the first three words of the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution.
    2. The people of the state or district from which they were elected, regardless of any political affiliation.

    Ideally, it should stop here, but realistically, we know it probably won't, but the next priorities should be minimal and at a far distance from the first two,

    3. The people from their home state or district who voted them into office or who belong to the same political party.
    4. Their financial backers (lobbyists, self-serving corporations, special interest groups, and wealthy financiers).
    5. Their political party, providing support for their platforms to gain their endorsement and support.
    6. Their own self-interests (usually pride, prestige, and wealth), but primarily getting re-elected.

    Instead, this is how their priorities actually stack up:

    1. Their own selfish interests, especially re-election.
    2. Their political party.
    3. Their financial backers.
    4. The people from their home state or district who voted them into office or who belong to the same political party.
    5. The people of their home state or district, regardless of any political affiliation or voting record.
    6. Our country and its people.

    References: "Big Problems with Our Two-Party System" and "Congress Ignores the Will of the People"

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