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Miclaus Maria-Luiza

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Do you agree with euthanasia? (for humans)

I recently had an argument with 2 of my teachers on this subject. Whenever asked whether they agree with euthanasia or not they were either avoiding to answer or they were completely against it without bringing any arguments to support their opinion.
As far as I've noticed this is a very controversial and sensitive subject but I couldn't find anyone to debate it with.
Both my history and my religion teacher found their safety saying that Jesus says humans have no right to take away anyone's life but they didn't share their personal opinion.
Basically my belief is that endeed we do not have that right but in some cases,when for instance a certain person is too sick and hasn't got any chance of getting better and that person doesn't have the streght or the will to fight anymore and their desire is to die,shouldn't they be given this right?

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    May 29 2013: Re: "but in some cases,when for instance a certain person is too sick and hasn't got any chance of getting better and that person doesn't have the streght or the will to fight anymore and their desire is to die,shouldn't they be given this right?"

    My question is: who determines how much pain we can endure? Who determines that a person does not have any chance? Forget the doctor; can even the person in pain know these things? Some people give birth without anesthetics, and some think that pain from a cut finger is unbearable.

    The practice of killing sick people would, actually, dramatically reduce healthcare costs, solve much of the social security crisis improving the government budget, and make society overall healthier and more productive. Someone just has to define what constitutes a "terminal illness" and "unbearable pain". Way to go?
    • May 29 2013: that such a great point. i'm sure nearly everyone would be familiar with the idea of overcoming adversity and being thankful that they didn't give up, and the same goes for fights against diseases like cancer, it's always darkest before the dawn and all.

      that said though i wouldn't wish an increasingly painful slow death on anyone, knowing that every day is going to be worse than the previous one is akin to torture, so there more be some kind of line, as you suggest.

      also there's not just the individual to consider. when a person dies they take all of their knowledge, experience, and potential with them, and i'd argue that healthcare costs are irrelevant. disease can come to any of us so we shouldn't begrudge those who are sick because it could just as easily be us in their place. the costs are a result of the disease, not the diseased person. in addition, in trying to treat the sick we learn, and so society is much healthier thanks to treating sick people rather than just letting them die.
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        • May 29 2013: i don't know anyone thankfully. the transmission of pain can be blocked to be sure, but debilitating diseases such as brain tumors can progress to the point where loss of motor control and bodily functions is continuous and ongoing. the pain of slowly becoming trapped within one's own body cannot be fixed with an IV.
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          May 29 2013: I like your point of view.I think everyone should hold on tight to their lives for as long as they can and try to enjoy every minute of it. I especially liked when you pointed out that everyone should be "the master of their own destiny". I believe that what makes a person is his character and attitude towards the world,but,more important,towards themselves.
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          May 29 2013: Kate, I strongly agree with your position. Taking action to end one's life is a different moral choice than taking no action to save one. Trying to ease the pain of a dying person while not acting to prolong the person's life is acceptable to me. Acting to end the person's life is not.
        • May 30 2013: kate i really agree with you. what i mean to say is that it shouldn't be completely off the table. i too would probably choose to spend every possible second with my family even under the agony, but i could completely understand people who, in say the last 2 weeks of their life, had said their goodbyes, gotten everything in order, and would prefer to end it there rather than waiting to be suffocated to death by their disease at some random interval between now and the next 2 weeks.

          all of my grandparents too lived right to the end, however if one of them had wanted to cut it short by a week or 2 i would have found it very difficult to refuse their request. how can we be master of our own destiny if we're prohibited from deciding to end our own life?
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        • May 31 2013: right i understand that, you've reiterated a number of points that aren't what i'm asking.

          say you were in the final stage of a terminal illness, you were in the final 2 weeks of a battle years long, you'd gotten your affairs in order, said your goodbyes, and had left left but to endure increasing pain all while waiting for your disease to asphyxiate you at some random time between now and the next 2 weeks, and so you decide you'd prefer to end it now and on your own terms. how would you feel about someone telling you no you couldn't because it's illegal?

          how can we be master of our own destiny if we're prohibited from deciding to end our own life?
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        • May 31 2013: i hear you fine, you're not reading my comments properly. as i said above not all pain is physical and so not all pain can be controlled by medication.

          please answer my question regarding choosing to die now peacefully on your own terms or waiting to be die naturally, gasping for breath as you are asphyxiated by your disease at some random time in the next 2 weeks?
    • May 30 2013: Ultimately it should be up to the individual himaelf and hopefully, his loved ones, government and others would honor HIS wishes...whatever they be.
    • May 31 2013: Arkady: The practice of killing sick people would, actually, dramatically reduce healthcare costs, solve much of the social security crisis improving the government budget.


      Didn't they use that same justification in pre-war 2 Germany?
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        May 31 2013: I said that with "tongue in cheek", "playing Devil's advocate". I hope, eugenics is gone for good. Somehow, many attempts to improve society end up doing the opposite.
        • Jun 1 2013: there really should be a tongue in cheek icon :)

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