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shishir gupta

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When Ted Members conduct an act of replying or commenting, is that process a real creative product?

When Ted Members conduct an act of replying or commenting- Is that process a real creative, having the purest Thought, with no expectation or consideration of the reader?

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  • May 22 2013: Shishir,
    Personally, I react instinctively. When asked a thoughtful question, I will give a thoughtful answer. Whether it's creative or not, I don't know. I am a creative person, but I don't know if all my replies or comments are creative in the same sense.

    In regard to "no expectation or consideration of the reader": I have no expectations, except perhaps a cordial reply. I have enormous consideration, which is why I take the effort and time to reply in the first place.
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      May 22 2013: are you living in a life in which subconsciously you want to be socially recognized? or your 20+ ted score subconsciously forces you to give a second thought to your primary thought.
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      May 22 2013: sorry if i am sounding offensive, but for me the creative thought is one in which you dont even have to give it a cognitive consideration even of grammar or spelling mistakes.... that surely will be rubbish but will be there as it was born.
      • May 22 2013: Hi Shishir,
        I'm not offended at all! This is all about clarity!

        In answer to your fist question: I don't think my score has any affect whatsoever on how much thought I put into my comments - I still react instinctively, certainly not in an effort to raise it.

        In your second comment, I understand a bit better what you're getting at. You are talking about a raw, creative, abstract thought, which is perhaps not refined. That would be a collection of words, emotions, ideas, all jumbled up. I agree, it would be difficult to make sense out of a purely instinctive comment.
        If I were to write my above reply using only abstract thoughts, it might look something like this:

        no offense
        clarity
        instinct thinking
        don't care about score, just ideas

        But even this is cognitive...

        Of course we need to refine our abstract thoughts to make ourselves understandable, so some refining is required. Whether that can be seen as the creative product you're talking about, I don't know.

        Could it be, that the brain sees, interprets and translates our abstract thoughts so quickly, we don't have time to stop it from refining?
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          May 22 2013: Kudos to you, you got my abstract thought right,- Beautiful.

          The explanation offered is elaborative but i was escaping the trouble of refining it.

          Talking about my own experience, there are times when my refining speeds lags behind my thought bombarding processes and eventually i am so drawn in to the present beauty of every single thought that i literally prefer to escape the botheration of refining them.

          i guess its just me.
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          May 22 2013: Why not thinkers should outsource the zeal of doing something to the doers.. ?

          I am always a firm believer of "a person should only do what he is good at".
          But the current situations to survive suggests that one must act upon what you have thought.
          Now that is true, if one has thought something great then it has to be brought to life.
          But if a person is a cool thinker then he must think only coz thinking and acting are two different acts and thoughts come in a free mind and without an appointment.

          My only suggestion is that TED or some other big organisation should also consider pure thoughts/ideas and these ideas at there should be a platform, a platform where doers can offer there efforts and expertise in that field to bring it to the shape.
          and let the person just think!!!

          would be a Wonderful world.... for me at least.

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