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Director, WHITEandBLACKandRED

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Risks are important. But how do you decide which ones are worth taking and when to be more calculative.

Risks are at the end just that... risks.. with a substancial probability of failure. Mostly everyone likes to believe they take risks in their own lives.. but we all have a degree of what we consider risks.. 'calculative risks' and a degree of intuition. Like i could take risks in careers and lifestyles, but not physical risks.
What process do you use to figure when to follow your heart and when to follow your brain and how to balance the two..

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  • Vijay P

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    Apr 7 2011: Imagine driving down a highway in dark and suddenly some animal appears out of nowhere and you swerve and luckily avoid the collision. You thank heavens and move on. If you had spent thinking about possibilities and probabilities you might not even be driving. So it is better to rely on instincts and let your will guide your actions. Rationality at best gives you words and phrases for an intelligent conversation, but might not equip you to really appreciate the essence of the whole.
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      Apr 17 2011: "Imagine driving down a highway in dark and suddenly some animal appears out of nowhere and you swerve and luckily avoid the collision."

      I know it's a gut reaction, but....most Police and EMTs will tell you that you need to NOT swerve, but drive right over the animal....statistically, you will end up with far less damage to your car and you and any passengers.
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      Apr 19 2011: Vijay that is an interesting thought. A prior knowledge impact your reactions in circumstances like you have just mentioned. Many reactions are behaviors that can be modified. A police man or EMT is likely to have trained in a similar scenario and would have a very different initial reactions from the training.
      • Apr 24 2011: I agree that initial training (or if you allow me the liberty, conditioning) affects the way we behave. However the point I'm trying to make here is that whether to indulge in something (driving on highway is an illustration, but the example can be applied to anything else in life - should I now accept this new job offer, should I talk to this strange looking man or not etc) is not necessarily a matter of rationality. It is a matter of what your instincts tell you to do. But once you are indulged your reactions depend on your conditioning (cultural, educational, your own self beliefs etc.) This book "Blink" (http://www.gladwell.com/blink/index.html) by Malcom Gladwell is another example of what I'm trying to say. In fact as per him our instincts are product of our collective experience that is not necessarily in our conscious mind. We do not necessarily make optimal decisions by thinking through, which is what I also think!

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