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Olivier Coquillo

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Why can't we all get together and find a cure to all terminal diseases?

I have not done enough research on collaboration between research centers but I promise to read all of your comments, since I am mostly asking this question to learn from you.

One of my dreams is to be able to witness an international collaboration and a public commitment from top research centers to find a cure to terminal diseases and to distribute the cure for free to people in need.

Do you think that there is a competition between research centers and scientists? Do you think that some groups are more focused on finding a cure to make money rather than finding a cure to save lives? I would love to know what you think.

OC

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  • May 3 2013: Money is a major hinderance to this. It can cost upwards of a billion USD and take more than a decade to get a singular drug in the mass market. Drugs and cures for diseases have to first be synthesized, tested heavily, and then prepared for mass production.

    So research centers and companies have to make a return on this investment, so they focus on the ailments of more wealthy countries. That's why there are so few treatments for tropical diseases, since companies and research centers don't get a very good return on investment in countries like the Congo as they would in North America and Europe. For most companies, it seems that the main goal is to make money, with the added benefit of saving lives.

    However, if money wasn't an issue... I think it would be a very real possibility for research centers and scientists to collaborate, similar to what was done with the Human Genome project. It'll take a while because of the development process, but it can be done.
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      May 6 2013: Ben, thank you for your post, and I appreciate your last words: "It can be done."

      OC

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