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russell lester

Orchardist, Grange

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Urban culture and space exploration what lessons can we apply from one to the other?

We are facing population explosions of unheard of magnitude, for example India must build the equivalent of one city of Chicago each year, for the next twenty years. What can we learn from having to build cities that are substainable, and what can we apply it to in space? what has space exploration taught us that we can apply to cities?

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Closing Statement from russell lester

What I was asking really was what skills we could take from our building of micro bio spheres in space, and use them on Earth in cities, and what skills we have developed on the Earth to deal with urban crowding and resource depletion that might be useful in space exploration. I do think that on of the primary solutions to the climate and population issues could be colonization. We would have to give up the notion that we were living in a risk free world and accept some losses in the process, but missions to Near Earth Asteroids, Lunar and Martian Colonies even trips to the Jovian moons, in the early days of exploration on earth there were many voyages that were of multi year duration and many that failed fatally but certainly the frontier gave a needed pressure release to overpopulation then, and the evolution of city design can be clearly seen if you compare the city of Athens London New York and Calgary, the use of solar power for many warning signs and the computer control traffic lights might also be claimed as decedents of space tech while in space the waste re reclamation system might be a refinement of the municipal water treatment plant. The idea of multi spectral lighting in space for an example is what I was looking for, thats a great idea, how about the heat exchangers used in space to somehow convert the waste heat of 10,000,000 people into power? If I reopen the topic I'll give it more time. Thanks for your comments.

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