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Suanna Morón

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Can money really buy happiness?

Okay, so we have all heard this question before. I know that for a fact we're all told that money doesn't buy happiness. But when you actually think about it can it? With money you can buy so many things you want that could make you happy. But you can't buy the fundamentals in life. I just want people's opinions on this cause I always hear such contradicting answers.

Topics: life money people
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    Apr 29 2013: I read a story recently where researchers (!) found that people were happiest in any society when they earned the amount of money that allowed them to have financial security, but as they earned more, their level of happiness first leveled off, then plummeted as the earnings went much higher. In other words, it appears for many people financial security brings more happiness than overt wealth.
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      Apr 29 2013: did they also research the exact amount that gives financial security? did they research the location and time variance of it? what is the research methodology? did they simply ask, or they somehow measured happiness? if the latter, how?
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        Apr 29 2013: Details of the study can be found here: http://www.inc.com/news/articles/2010/09/study-says-$75,000-can-buy-happiness.html

        As you can see, it's based on 450,000 Americans, so it's biased in that regard. I'm not here to argue for the validity or veracity of the study's findings; but I do think it suggests an interesting conclusion: more money, after a point, doesn't necessarily mean more happiness.
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          Apr 29 2013: "But when asked to assess the happy hours of the previous day – whether people had experienced a lot of enjoyment, laughter, smiling, anger, stress, worry – money mattered only up to about $75,000"

          for example middle class guy says "i was sad yesterday because my car broke, and repairs took away the money saved to buy a new computer for my son"

          and the rich guy says "i was sad yesterday, because my new company does not have the sales we hoped for. we need to rethink our marketing"

          and so the conclusion is that they are equally (un)happy. on the other hand, my conclusion is that another chunk of taxpayer money was wasted in an obviously crappy research.
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        Apr 29 2013: Princeton University is a private university.
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        Apr 29 2013: I'm sorry if I've upset you in some way. I merely found the study anecdotally interesting and said I wouldn't vouch for its veracity or validity. You mentioned this was a waste of taxpayer money, and I merely pointed out the study was conducted at a private university.

        I'm far more interested in the topic of happiness and money than a semantic argument. Have a nice day, Krisztian.
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          Apr 29 2013: the study upsets me. as an engineer, i have some knowledge how to conduct an experiment to exclude subjective factors. it is a complete shame that people can put forward such unsupported results without blushing. for their sake, i assume political activism. it is the best excuse.
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        Apr 29 2013: Fair enough. I read this more as an opinion poll, which can be much more lax in its structure. But as a study, you're correct, it may lack some rigor of an official scientific study.

        Whatever the case, if the results are true, it points to an interesting conclusion: money up to a point is a good thing and, beyond that, may have negative returns.

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