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What is your definition of 'freedom'?

Every now and then we all question our own sense of freedom and what it is to be 'free'. How it is to live in the 'land of the free'. As much as it can sometimes be a little deep to talk about with peers, I thought this would be the best place to propose a discussion on your personal opinion of what it is to be 'free'.

See, a lot of people I've asked define 'freedom' as the opportunity to do what ever you want... I then follow this with asking, 'If everyone did as they wished, you'd then be bound by a constant fear of the actions of others, would you not? Then how 'free' would you feel?'

I simply want to start this conversation not because I believe 'freedom' is a definable concept, but because everyones' opinions of the idea is different and it's interesting to hear those opinions.

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  • Apr 28 2013: My view of freedom stems from the concept of individual liberty.

    We don't grow up in a vacuum, but rather learn a whole range of givens and circumstances that help define who we are and how we respond to our siblings, parents, and others which in turn results in feedback that helps satisfy our basic cares, wants and needs.

    As a result, many of us, as we become adults continue the traditions of our family including religious beliefs and adopt these cultural influences including politics, way of life, etc., automatically.

    Freedom can become a factor in our lives when knowledge and a greater exposure to life affects changes in our views. The value of freedom stems from the concept of liberty. The idea that an individual is entitled to their own pursuit of happiness and therefore entitled to choices in terms of belief systems, politics, lifestyle, etc., as an individual right - to me is the crux of what the idea of freedom is all about.

    Political freedom is what keeps authority from imposing the will of the majority on everyone. It is what the Bill of Right is all about in the US Constitution.

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