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aziz memmi

Student in Business administration, Tunis business school

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Isn't studying the enemy's culture and incentives the future of warfare?

With cultural gaps getting larger, every single misunderstanding can lead to a conflict. That is why getting inside the 'enemy''s head might be the most important feature of modern warfare.
Will cultural intelligence be an essential skill as for the future command officers?

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    Apr 24 2013: spread porn in islam dominated areas?

    however, understanding different cultures seem to me the best way to avoid wars. i remember that documentary, "The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara", in which mcnamara explains that the entire vietnam war was a misunderstanding, and only if the US would have understood the mindset of vietnamese people, the war would not have happened, and so many lives would have been spared.
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    Apr 22 2013: How do NATO's officials make difference between a "good insurgent" and a "bad maverick" in order to decide whether or not proposing help?
  • Apr 22 2013: This has always been done.
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      Apr 22 2013: Properly done? I don't think so.
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          Apr 24 2013: Take the example of Afghanistan. The north is a typical area of coexisting cultures: Mongols, Russians, Afghan, Arab, and plenty of other ethnic minorities. Just trying to communicate is a challenge. Let alone trying to solve conflicts. Of course it would be much easier to just shoot everybody around. What i want to say is that studying cultural backgrounds is the least of concerns for war lords. I can think of many other examples through history of wars starting upon an avoidable misunderstanding.