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Casey Kitchel

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What is the best way to prevent rape in war zones?

Rape in war zones is an issue of utmost urgency and needs to be stopped.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_rape

The purpose of this debate is to find solutions to a problem with very real and horrific consequences. All are welcome to participate and contribute, all I ask is for everyone to please be thoughtful and considerate with their contributions. I look forward to seeing what solutions the TED community can come forth with. Thank you.

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      Apr 21 2013: Kate,

      Thank you for joining in and I hope more people decide to participate, whether its to share their thoughts, provide solutions, or just to observe. The more people share, the better.

      As for "all sides do it but there is absolutely NO excuse", I agree completely.
    • Apr 23 2013: I am a Korea War, vet, rather lucky in avoiding most of the trauma, just by chance. I laughed at the idea that I could possible experience Combat Fatigue, or PTSD. Lately , on account of the revelaton that many of our vets are committing suicide every day, I came across some research which ought to be inducing some radical re-thinking. Going back to WW1 "Shell Shock" was of course a big interest in the military, if only defensively. But what to make of the revelation , in a British 1918 study, that only 20% of the men "out of commission" on account of S.S. had actually even BEEN in combat. But they were incapacitated just the same. And remember, in those days, we didn't have the kind of sympathetic treatment of "Slackers" that would be normal now. ( A good account of this is in the novel "The Good Soldier Schweik")
      Along with all this, I have come to believe that our whole society , from top to bottom , is showing definite sighs of PTSD. Neurotically over reacting to shadows, failing to act where it is clearly called for, various inexplicable "incidents" , like the bombing, or the school shootings,, our President bragging about torturing people (something not even the Nazis publicly admitted) A very long list of strange happenings which are consistent with ongoing, relentless over -stresses. In short, it is a Group Neurosis, like a Mass Panic. People vary in their abillity to resist this; not all soldiers get "Combat Fatigue". There is a very good sociological study on such stress, called "Future Shock" about how even changes for the BETTER are stressful, not to mention the run of the mill ones such as getting divorced, or losing your job.
      One such example of "change for the better " induced stress might be the apparently uncontrollable climate of rapes within all modern female "integrated" military services. It may welll be that all the "improvements" of the last couple of generations is more than our society can stand right now.
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        • Apr 23 2013: Thanks for the kind words Kate. It does seem that "stresses" are additive.. One of the interesting points in the book "Future Shock" was a discussion of what the individual can do to mitigate some of this, at least personally.
          As to whether some men are intimidated by competent women, that is no doubt true, but for everyone like that I would suppose, at least the men trained up by Evolution, a lot more stress would come from the dim recognition that if things got difficult , they would be expected to rescue the women, and feel bad if they couldn't. More stress. All mostly un conscious, no doubt. It's a situational thing, not anyone's fault.

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