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Implement term limits so that (any) new legislation has a chance.

I received a 'canned' email from Senator Blumenthal detailing his disappointment that recent Gun Control legislation did not pass. In his email Senator Blumenthal vowed "to push legislation to make our streets and schools safer". I wrote back: "It won't really matter how much you 'push for legislation'. How Congressmen/women get compensated affects which laws pass and which don't. Would you support term limits? 3 terms is too many (proposed by Senator David Vitter (R-LA). I don't want to see anyone in office for 3 terms. 2 years max, then get a REAL job like the rest of us. If you only had two years in Congress, you would submit and or pass legislation more honestly since the longevity of your career would not depend on it."

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    Apr 20 2013: For Liberals and Conservatives alike the definition of a good politician is one who consistently supports the ideological agenda. Why would it be a good idea to disallow continued service for a good politician? I completely agree with the idea of culling bad politicians and I think we should use recalls and impeachment more frequently to do just that. But term limits have a built in down side and should NOT be implemented. I do agree no person is capable of serving as POTUS for more than 8 years because the job is ultra-stressful and takes its toll quickly.
    • Apr 20 2013: I suppose 'good' is relative and depends on whose opinion is at hand. I don't have much faith in politicians or that there are 'good politicians' in general. The 'lowest common denominator' therefore might be applying a rule where no one, perceived as either good or bad, gets to stay in office for too long. More importantly, the point of term limits would be to deter politicians from letting their personal campaign get in the way of any legislation for a greater good. The way the system is now, its more or less 'built in' that politicians can allow their personal campaign (job tenure) to be persuaded by powerful groups, such as the NRA, or large corporations, other interest groups with deep pockets, etc.
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        Apr 21 2013: Term limits would merely change the name of the beneficiary of the deep pocket money. Good politicians exist in both camps. They should be allowed to continue serving. Whether we should outlaw questionable funding of candidates is a different question. Term limits would solve nothing and would diminish the power and influence of committee chairmen who enjoy hard-earned seniority as a result of long, faithful service. It is not realistic to insist there are no good politicians. Indeed, if the sweeping generalization that all politicians are bad is true we would be in a lot more trouble than we are now, if you can imagine that! Some see the NRA as the cause of our troubles. Others see the less-well organized opponents of the second amendment as the culprit. That's politics. We are a polarized nation of 47% Liberals, 47% Conservatives, and 6% Independents. Each side believes the world would be better off if they were allowed to implement their plans without opposition, but that is not how a Representative Republic works. Opposition and checks and balances are essential to freedom. Term limits would have a deleterious effect on both opposition and checks and balances. The only indication that a politician has stayed in office too long is their inability to uphold their sworn duty to the American people who elected them. Recall and Impeachment YES! Term limits NO!
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        Apr 21 2013: RE: "Are you asking an honest question. . . ?" I am flattered that you think I am capable of understanding your assertion that term limits would solve the problem of buying and selling political influence. But I do not. I see no causal relationship between the two. Please explain your reasoning. By the way, I have no interest in "winning you over to my perspective."

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