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Warren Gee

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Would having a "Fact Check Accurate" seal on a political ad help you in deciding what to vote for?

As part of my English thesis, this is question 2 relating to the ability to sort out if political ads are truthful in their disclosure to the public.

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Closing Statement from Warren Gee

With the limited number of responses, an analysis of the questions are as follows:
· The voters were generally not trusting the idea that a seal of approval would help them believe that a political ad was truthful.
· The voters were more inclined to support a measure that would require that political ads must be fact checked prior to being used publicly
· The voters were evenly divided that if they were an elected official, that they would support the practice of submitting a political ad prior to putting the ad out to the public.
· Of the elected officials that responded, one was trusting the idea that a seal of approval would help them believe that a political ad was truthful, whereas one would be trusting as long as the fact checking organization was reputable.
· Of the elected officials that responded, one was inclined to support a measure that would require that political ads to be fact checked prior to being used publicly where one would be willing to examine the language of such measure.
· Of the elected officials that responded, both would support the practice of submitting a political ad prior to putting the ad out to the public noting that one would do so if the fact checking organization was reputable.
Answers submitted by eight of the nine non-elected respondents and one elected respondent, were done so with a “Yes” or “No” answer. One elected respondent and one non-elected respondent did not answer either “Yes” or “No” but with comments regarding qualifiers to the original questions. In actuality, I had a hidden agenda to the questions that I posed to both the elected and non-elected respondents. In leaving out the qualifiers, I suspected that the elected officials may not respond or would answer in a way that would avoid a total commitment of a simple “Yes” or “No” answer, and likewise I suspected that the common voter would simply see the question for what it was and just put “Yes” or “No”. I was not disappointed with the answers.

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    Apr 18 2013: Who guards the guardians?

    I would like to see a fact checking service on the internet, "This site checked by Veritas" and all the statements of fact would be highlighted in green with a link to the reference source and or a note by the fact checker. The same service would then be available to work with political ads. The problem of course is what to do when Fox news buys out Veritas?
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      Apr 18 2013: Perhaps the agency doing the checking needs to be set up as a non-profit with bylaws which would then prevent the organization from being sold. I think with enough transparency it should give the organization credibility. I know that there is www.FactCheck.org, but I have not yet had time to review the entire site. For now, I am looking to invoke a response that I can use as a resource for my English thesis, due in a few weeks. I agree with the methodology you describe. Thanks again for commenting.

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