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With this advance in technology, can we translate the brain storms into images?

With this advance in technology, can we translate the brain storms into images?

If the brain storms can be translated into sound, why not images?

If the brain storms can be successfully translated into images, can we then
:
1) Record dreams.
2) Enable paralised people to communicate by thought by thinking of an image of what they want/need and project that on a screen.

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  • Apr 15 2013: I do not think that this is possible. You could not paint a correct image just from sounds. Or can you tell just by listening to a record of eating people what food they eat, how they look, what the room or table looks like?

    And, why should the noise you hear be the message? Maybe it is just noise, and nothing else. Like the noise of a typewriter, could tell something is written, but not which letter...
    • Apr 16 2013: The sound of a 'brain storm' shown in the video is the most simplest way of converting electrical impulses into something fallible.
      Everything you interact with on a day-to-day basis is based on electrical impulses, the end result of that interaction is purely how it's been interpreted.

      E.g a computer, a printer, a fax machine, just seeing things.. all electrical impulses converted into something else to produce the end-product.

      An example of a device that uses sound converted into an image is a fax machine. Have you ever picked up the phone during a fax transmission? Similar technology 'could' be used to convert what we heard in the 'brain storm' in the video, into an image.

      I guess the biggest problem is getting the brain to isolate a single image 100% and have the sound of that transmitted to a printing device or projector.
      Only very skilled people can just focus on a single thing only. I.E seasoned meditators.

      As for the typewriter analogy, as with a keyboard, you can identify what key is being pressed just from the sound of the key, as long as a control system is in place for comparison.

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