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Do state governments sufficiently regulate fracking of natural gas?

The removal of gas from the shale layers employs a process called fracking which, as I understand it, essentialy cracks and crushes the shale layer (through explosives) thus freeing the gas, which is washed out with chemically treated salt water. The companies who do this are mostly from the West, and have moved to the fields in the East (such as, Marcellus Shale), where they expertly maneuver through ill-suited Eastern laws, pay landowners sums that seem large to poor people, and damage the land through many levels of earth, to capture the gas and make millions. I believe the States in the East are turning a blind eye to the danger and abuses and frauds because the money has been good, compared to no money. I think there should be a moratorium on fracking, pending legislative study. I would like payment of my delay rental first, though, because I likewise turn a blind eye to potential damage in exchange for dollars.

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  • Apr 6 2013: In some cases. George Mitchell who invented this is supposedly concerned by the lack of study. There have always been pirates in the oil industry. Know what you are doing and be responsible.
    • mary T

      • +1
      Apr 6 2013: Thank you for your response. I'm sorry to say I don't know the history and background of fracking. I do see its present impact on the people of my community. Such a variation in the sums paid for delay rentals, such a variation in lease terms! And when it's over, will we be left with a mess to clean up? I just don't know. I appreciate the income it brings to my neighbors, but I'm not sure it's going to be a good thing, long term. And I feel like the income itself is a pittance. I gave way to my family on its desire to lease our land, but if it had been up to me, I wouldn't have done it, at least not yet. Still, I took the money, so blah blah blah as far as I'm concerned, I suppose.
      • Apr 7 2013: George Mitchell pioneered it in Texas. If you live in Texas and had only a small piece of land our oil and gas law could have provided that the well be drillede no matter what you did. It could be a good thing or a bad thing depending on how the drillers follow the rules. It's like surgery in that even if things are done correctly things can go wrong. American troops seem to go where the oil is, so I support drilling responsibly, and we should save are resources and use all we use responsibly.
        • mary T

          • +1
          Apr 10 2013: Where I am, Pennsylvania, I have heard the agents for the oil and gas companies tell people that it doesn't matter if they consent or not, to the fracking. They claim that they can just drill on the neighboring piece, then set off explosives, free the gas, and then capture it. I understand that, under our law, gas is like a wild animal -- the person who captures it, owns it. But I can imagine that the destruction of the shale layer (to free the gas) might be challenged at some point. The shale layer may be out of sight, but it's still mine, under my land. It seems incorrect to think someone can basically stand off to the side of my land and destroy it. Of course, that may be a challenge that noone ever makes. The land I own alone, I didn't sign a lease. So maybe my descendants will fight about it.

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