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Charge your electric car in 3 minuets

Why do all electric cars have to just sit by an outlet for 12 hours? why can't we just replace the fuel in it like we do with gasoline powered cars? My idea is that we have gas stations charge extra batteries and when you pull into the gas station you pay per battery and just replace them making filling up your electric car almost instantaneous. The car itself could be made user friendly by not making the user plug in every battery like conventionally they would but, instead have slots in which the batteries are place then slide a plannel over top of them connecting them properly then all you would have to do is fold down 2 flaps on either side connecting them into the car while also securing this latch that goes over the batteries connecting them.

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    Apr 4 2013: Why not use Hydrogen Fuel Cells which already exist. There are cars available that can go almost 400 miles on 1 10 minute fill up.
    • Apr 5 2013: yes and once one of them get T-boned by a semi it's gonna blow up the entire block haha
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    Apr 4 2013: A youtube vid you might find interesting
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qd0WPw3p2MQ
  • Apr 3 2013: Oh I thought i was being helpful You have had a good idea. However, I remember hearing this on NPR The President of SAP was approached by the Prime Minister of Israel that it would be good to move on and wouldn't it be better if we had a better electric car? He has been working on this unique idea. It's a very clever idea and not too many have considered it. I guess I am old fashioned but National Public Radio has some good things. There is even a Ted Hour.
    • Apr 3 2013: Yeah I googled this after the guy told me the idea is good the real problem though is how weak eltric cars are as of now. If they become severly improved then this idea can work just fine but, eletric cars have such a small range and such a long charging time it may not work for a much longer time.
  • Apr 3 2013: A company is already working on changing the battery, and I am under the impression that the country of israel is trying to facilitate this idea. These would be battery changing stations.
    • Apr 3 2013: That's cool you have a link to that or something? what company? and what's their idea on it?

      Also yes i know as someone told me on this conversation previously. Kinda bummed me out though I though i was being all original and whatnot. haha
  • Apr 3 2013: My two cents worth:

    The weight of the batteries would require heavy duty equipment, and I suspect the quickest and overall best way to handle the operation would be to fully automate the process. In addition, it would require a considerable number of extra batteries to be stored at these stations. All of this equipment, plus the extra batteries and the building to store of all this, would increase the expense of recharging and the total cost of operating the vehicle. Considering that these vehicles are already expensive, this extra expense might make them noncompetitive.

    A second way to accomplish instant recharging would be to store extra vehicles at the recharging station, and just switch to a different vehicle.
    • Apr 3 2013: Equipment like this would be expensive to buy at first but, it wouldn't be to difficult or to bulky. Storing them wouldn't be difficult either just imagine having a robot arm (a modified version of the ones that build cars) on a track with a wall filled with these batteries the arm could easily do the work it would be fast as well. Oh an also i forgot that gas stations are owned by oil companies, the richest businesses in the world so the purchase of this would not be a problem
  • Apr 3 2013: It is good as an idea, however at the current size and weight of batteries, that will imply some practical problems, first of all, it would be a (literally) breaking back job for humans, so it would require a fully automated system to bring the batteries from the warehouse to the "pump", replace the batteries, move them to a recharge station, and once charged move them back to the warehouse. You need a very efficient system to queue the batteries at the "pump", in case 3 or more vehicles are waiting each second counts. If each battery takes 12 hours to fully charge and you are dispatching a couple of them ever 3 minutes, there are many points in a system like this in which the most insignificant planning mistake can either stop the system or rise the cost enormously.
    • Apr 3 2013: yes, but the current size and weight of batteries are due to the fact that they are not made to be moved or switched. I meant to use a lighter battery that can be switched by anyone but, you're probally right in that a automatic system would be the best way to go. Don't know why they'd have to go to a warehous though? why not just use one battery size for all cars and have a machine that performs 2 simple actions (retrieval and placing into charging area) because putting them into the car would use the same action just reversed as the retrieval.
      • Apr 3 2013: Batteries are heavy because they require water on them to make them work and not otherwise, so unless other technology is implemented they will still be heavy. You do need a warehouse for the simple reason that you are going dispatch batteries faster than they charge, and even if you could charge them at the same speed you serve them, what would you do in case of a black out?... so you need a warehouse anyway. Retrieval and placing are two different actions, for retrieval you need to queue batteries at the charge station, and for placing you need to queue batteries at the placement area, if you use the same machine for both actions you will run intro trouble whenever you need to replace the batteries of two or more cars at the same time.
        • Apr 5 2013: i just meant the fact that they are large we could make many much smaller, batteries which could also be charged much faster and blackouts are a problem but it's not the gas station's problem it's the power companies and eletric car owner's problem so a warehouse would not be there most likely
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    • Apr 2 2013: yes i know it's not and oh i didn't know....
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    Apr 2 2013: I believe the problem with current technology is that existing batteries are heavy, bulky, and difficult to change out. As technology improves, I'm sure your idea will be adopted.
    • Apr 2 2013: we could easily do this now though car batteries are not heavy and mixed with the idea of connecting them with one panel makes connecting them extreemly simple