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Nicholas Lukowiak

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Why and when do you decide to like either a comment or conversation?

What qualities or attributes about a comment or conversation, do you just want to be like "I am going to :like: that!"

I know there are conversations about "what makes a good debate," I felt most took those discussions with an objective mindset. Let's narrow it down to TED. On TED.com when is the most likely time you will support someone's post?

There is a sense of 'promoting' others by liking them, even giving them credit (bad pun), but what is the trick to getting you to :like: someone's post?

This 'question' can definitely help out the community of TEDsters who use the conversation boards regularly. I been posting on them myself for a year or two now and since then, a lot of people have come and gone - from super active to complete stop in participation. Great minds have passively come through these conversation boards. Individuals I quote from time to time in short pieces, because they inspired me.

So, let this question help you, help everyone inspire more people!

What matters most?!
Grammar
Logic
Rhetoric
Semantic Usage
Rationality
Applicability
Universality
General Beliefs

A mixture? What's the BIG mix?
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If I had to simplify my thoughts, I look to :like: comments who are able to be multidimensional and divergent with their comments. Which allows more people to understand what they mean.

I :like: conversations when I get to have a good discussion in them or if the question has the qualities of the above; the ability to be responded to in diverse ways.

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SUPER INTERESTED TO SEE WHAT COMES OUT OF THIS!!

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    Mar 28 2013: I am generally attracted to conversations that are logical, and engage people's thoughts, ones that require us to actually think about what we are going to write before we do. Conversations that pose questions about self or institution would get my attention because of my interest in those topics.
    I tend to like comments that are generally in line with my own thought process. However, a sound argument also tend to win me over, regardless of the position it takes.

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