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Hathaway Mann

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Living forever?

Most of us don't want to die, but life is ultimately death. Regardless of your religious preference, given the opportunity I wager the vast majority of us, especially under duress, would do almost anything to live longer or even forever. To get your mind into perspective try not to picture an aged old man, ruthless and toothless, looking to beat death as he as beaten his business competition like so much Dickens. More like a parent who wants to be with their child longer but the cancer will not allow it. How about something a little more flippant like a man who really loves to surf but age is catching up to him and he really wants to ride mavericks. One could make up any scenario. How about Einstein? What if he continued to live and in the process actually came up with a working theory of everything? How would humanity benefit from that? Scientifically speaking we are on the cusp of extending life far beyond the limits of natural means using nano machines, advanced drugs and eventually cybergenics. Given the immensity of such a technology would we still be just as bored as ever? A second chance in this case would mean something only if you were ready to take that next step, but if everyone can do it wouldn't it be more akin having ones teeth cleaned? Should it be available to everyone? Religion always weighs in so there would be the obligatory condemnation. The opposite side of that would be perhaps you are ready to die and cannot because it would be immoral to flip the power switch on your own and besides you don't know the code because congress has been swayed by religious leaders to prevent the loss of life for any reason, sort of like abortion or assisted suicide.
I think I'm writing a book here, but I rather believe that we are indeed heading for this debate eventually. I wonder if this would not be a debate if morality was based upon secular ideals and would instead be a question of who goes first?
Bon chance.

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    Mar 24 2013: Hathaway,
    As a person who has worked with a lot of elderly folks, and people in a terminal care facility, I do not agree with your statements expressing the idea that "Most of us don't want to die"...and..."given the opportunity I wager the vast majority of us, especially under duress, would do almost anything to live longer or even forever."

    I had my own brush with death, so "to get your mind into perspective", as you say, imagine a vibrant, very active person, who, after an emergency craniotomy, is unconscious, not supposed to live, and in fact, is kept alive with life support systems. Many of us have dealt with death from many different perspectives, and many of us accept it as part of the life/death/life cycle:>)

    You ask..."Given the immensity of... technology would we still be just as bored as ever?"
    If you are bored with life my friend, I suggest you take action to change that perception.

    I'm not sure if you are "writing a book here", as you say, or not. It does appear, however that you are exploring many questions in yourself.
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      Mar 25 2013: You assume to much or perhaps too little of me, but thank you my friend for your point of view.
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        Mar 25 2013: Hathaway,
        I am not assuming anything. I responded to what you wrote. What do you feel is an assumption?
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          Mar 25 2013: I assume that I will never respond to you again.
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        Mar 25 2013: OK....always a choice:>)

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