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Lena Elizabeth

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Is the internet adverse to intimacy?

An interesting comment I read about this "quick world" being to blame for a decline in intimacy, got me thinking...Are the internet and other advances in modern technology to blame for a decline in personal intimacy and romance?

Was the world really more intimate before the world-wide-web? If so, why has this technology, which was meant to bring us together, driven us further apart?

Is the technology dehumanizing or does it simply provide an outlet for a fear of intimacy that is already within us. http://www.psychalive.org/2011/11/fear-of-intimacy/ In a world, where people sit around a table typing on their iPhones instead of having meaningful conversation, it seems a revival of intimacy and attunement is more important than ever.

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  • Mar 29 2013: As i think, firstly, the internet made communications between people much more easier, then social networks were born, and while we were like "wow, now i can chat with a girl/boy i like, sitting still" we became to lazy to interact in "real world"
    So i think, the internet stolen the "play" part of intimacy, thus made us "boring" in real.
    I mean - what are you going to talk about on the first date/meet if u both already now nearly everything bout each other.
    Before it was like : Chat->conversation->play->friendship/relationships->love & sex
    Now internet stolen the chat&play part, so when couple of people meet in real, even after years of communication, they experience a problem: "i know him so well, but why im so nervous?", "what should i do now, are we already a couple or not?", "is it a date?" and so on. And everything goes very very wrong:)
    But, if a couple succesfully passes that first date, there's a chance that all gonna be ok, just because both just found a person with whom they can talk/chat ALOT about their similar interests etc.

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