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Christopher Halliwell

Secondary Education Physics, Mississippi State University

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What is the advantage of evolving the ability to cry?

Is it simply a result of evolving the ability for complex emotions?

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  • Mar 15 2013: yes artificial pity we all feel it when someone is crying and often that is their goal to make you feel bad for them which in turn aids them in whatever their own moral wants and desires are and yes i understand that it isn't just women that cry that's why i said weaker individuals i am talking about how we evolved it not what it is presently i'm just proposing that crying is just a defense mechanism for when only the strongest had their way and the weaker individuals had no say because it was a world where physical strength prevailed over all else and strength has always been dominant in men
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      Mar 15 2013: Charles,
      We do not ALL feel "artificial pity" when someone is crying.....sorry you feel that way. And it is not just "weaker individuals" who cry.
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        Mar 18 2013: Hi Colleen, just answering your Q's from my comments here. It's hard to explain as I've grown up with this tradition, so it is normal for me. We don't talk about our feelings as it is written on our faces and in the tears, there is a lot of ceremony as well and that can get in the way if the person is publicly respected by a large group but generally a persons personal memory of an embarrassing or funny moment they shared with the person laying in state tells us just how close they were to them, it's their way of showing their pain and it is never written down as a speech. Pending on how close you are to the loved one, you stand up in front of everyone where ever you may be sitting in one of our halls and it just flows, it can get a bit flowery but the best ones are the funny stories. Some cannot finish as they might be overwhelmed. It's in the stories we share that connects you to the deceased. A window that you never knew was there.

        Even in this digital age, actually physically being there listening to the stories pulls you in. Our white kiwi's have adopted the funny story telling even if they have never been to one of ours, i have been to many a white friends gathering and have laughed til i cried, it's become cultural for them as well.

        We sing a lot, whatever you may know, the song is usually the finisher for your talk, a stamping of your story. Sealed with a song. Sorry Colleen if i'm not making sense, i really don't know how else to explain it in English.
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          Mar 20 2013: Thanks Ken....sorry it has taken me so long to respond. I felt touched by your comment, which is why I asked the questions, and I feel touched by this one as well:>)

          I think many times when we know people really well, and have shared many of the same life adventures, talking is not really needed....there is an understanding that is felt on a very deep level.....I experience that feeling with some friends.

          We have a similar practice at funerals here too....people in the audience are often invited to speak if they wish to. Somtimes people have written something down prior to the event, and sometimes not....it is a choice. I notice that often, however, a person who has written something down ignores it and just speaks from the heart in the moment. Sometimes, they are crying so much they cannot read the previously written words.

          You make a LOT of sense Ken, and your telling of the experience in the way you do so well, causes me to feel like I am there.....thank you:>)
    • Mar 16 2013: I think it's worth clarifying here that there is a difference between bawling like a baby because you stubbed your toe, and crying because something devastatingly sad happened.

      I also don't think it is a means of getting artificial pity, though some people may use it as manipulation for various reasons. If this were the case, why then would people choke back their tears? Why would they cry by themselves? Why would they be scared of being seen crying?
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      Mar 16 2013: You make an interesting point.

      However, tears may come at the most unexpected times due to deep deep sorrow.
      It is not always a sign of weakness.

      What is even more incredible is that holding back tears may even do you harm. Did you know that?
      Attached is an article you might enjoy reading.

      http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1755&dat=19840224&id=C7gdAAAAIBAJ&sjid=u2gEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6629,3363995

      [EDITED: I was just wondering why you have suddenly decided to start writing without the use of proper grammar and proper punctuation...it makes it hard to read your comments....??]

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