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greg dahlen

Alumnus, academy of achievement

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Why is no farmer as famous as Tom Cruise?

I have a lot of affection/appreciation for moviemakers, actors, directors, crew. I really value movies and think they're important. However, I think food is even more important because you will live without movies, but without food you will die. Therefore, I wonder, why is no farmer as famous as Tom Cruise?

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  • Mar 14 2013: The Farmer, Carpenter, Mason, and all practical people will never walk on the red carpet.
    Systematic exclusion does not see colour just profit and loss and maybe those mentioned above like things the way they are.
    What is important "the singer or the microphone"
    What is important "the quality of the food of the plate and accessories"
    What is impotant "looking nice or being nice" remember looking nice is very expensive but its profitable, being nice is not.
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    Mar 14 2013: Hi Greg,
    Farmers do not generally promote themselves, nor do they have "management teams" to promote them. The reason Tom Cruise, and other actors promote themselves, is to stay visible to the public, so the public likes them, and they can continue to work for big bucks.

    How "popular" a farmer is, does not determine the outcome of his/her chosen work. I live in a farming region, and I can tell you that farmers here are more well known and appreciated than Tom Cruise:>)
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      Mar 17 2013: But wouldn't you think some farmer would have hired someone to promote them, after all many of us desire fame, and among the millions and millions of farmers some probably desire it.
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        Mar 17 2013: Most of the farmers I know are much too practical and intelligent to think that fame is important:>)
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          Mar 18 2013: "most" may not value fame. But wouldn't you think some would be striving for it?
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        Mar 18 2013: I think/feel most people strive for something that is very important to them. There may be farmers who would like to be famous. I have not met any of them. We have farmers in this region who are well known leaders of national farming organizations, and I don't think many people in this area even know that fact. The farmers I know tend to be quiet, humble, and just want to do their thing without fanfare:>)
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          Mar 31 2013: Does it seem to you like fame is fun, Colleen? That you get to travel, meet more people, receive more ideas and stimulation, plumb yourself more deeply?
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        Mar 31 2013: Greg,
        Yes recognition is fun, and I experienced it on a very small scale as a professional actor, model, singer, dancer, Mrs. Vermont, etc.

        Yes, I got to travel, meet people receive ideas and stimulation, etc. I experienced more travel, met more people, learned more ideas and was stimulated MORE with my travels when I was NOT recognized.

        The recognition helped me get the attention of people and organizations which I used to further some causes....speaking to the state legislature to encourage better laws regarding domestic violence for example.

        Recognition gave me a little more "clout", when dealing with environmental issues with the state environmental board, environmental court, and the USEPA. Recognition helped when testifying before the state legislative committee regarding abuses in correctional facilities.

        Recognition, does not necessarily make a person good or bad...useful or not so useful. How we use recognition and/or fame is the important piece, don't you think?
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          Mar 31 2013: Well, that is surprising, Colleen, that you were more stimulated when not living a more spotlight kind of life. Do you see any logic to your experience, you can see why I would think the way I do, that the spotlight life is more interesting.
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        Mar 31 2013: Hi again Greg,
        I feel that the interactions I had with people around the world were more authentic....more genuine....when I was not recognized. Sometimes, you know, people want to connect BECAUSE a person is famous, or recognized, and that tends to lead to relationships that are not always genuine....know what I mean? I do not think/feel connections made while in the "spotlight" are always honest or authentic. Interesting....yes.....entertaining and stimulating yes.....authentic and genuine....not always.

        If a person "knows" him/herself, we can feel what is authentic and what is not, and we can navigate any situation more effectively. Like I said, fame and recognition does not make a person better or worse, good or bad, useful or not useful. HOW we use the situation makes the difference....in my humble perception:>)
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          Apr 1 2013: I'll have to think about it, Colleen. Personally I think I'd rather meet a person who is a little inauthentic and extremely stimulating than to meet a person who is very authentic but not very stimulating.

          As far as fame and recognition go, I don't know that being famous by itself makes a person good, it's what being famous says about a person. For example, you were Mrs. Vermont, and even if I never met you, I would say anyone who achieves Mrs. Vermont probably has some really good qualities.

          To some degree our chat here seems to be heading toward my other conversation about fame. Wonder how it illuminates my question here? I would have said that farmers were people of great character, but the fact that none of them has become famous makes me wonder, maybe they don't have as great of character as I think.
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        Apr 1 2013: Based on all of your comments Greg, it seems like you have fun pondering a LOT of things....I do too:>)

        I enjoy all types of people, and who we spend time with is always a choice in any given moment. I do not think/feel that simply being famous, makes a person good or bad, because in my perception, it depends on how a person uses the position.

        I agree that this chat is related to your other chat. Well honestly, I perceive EVERYTHING as interconnected, so it doesn't surprise me at all:>)

        I agree that farmers are GREAT characters.....I know and respect a LOT of them, because I live in a farming region of a farming state. One thing that always amazes me about framers is that they can do almost anything.....they are very creative, and can make or repair almost anything. They are very in touch with the land, weather patterns and animals. Most farmers in this area do some logging, and sugaring, so they're in the woods a lot, in addition to being aware of weather, when to plant, when to cut and bail hay, cut and chop corn etc. They are very in touch with nature.

        One can have GREAT character Greg, and not have a desire or need to be famous:>)
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          Apr 1 2013: well, are you saying that you don't have exceptionally good qualities of character to have achieved Mrs. Vermont, that your character is no better than more ordinary women who haven't achieved anything like that? I don't believe it.

          As farmers go, I then have to return to an earlier question, which is, okay, why hasn't one of them become famous? A model I think of is celebrity chefs. Would you agree with me, Colleen, that twenty years ago there were no celebrity chefs? But now we have some, such as Wolfgang Puck and Gordon Ramsey. Farming is just as interesting, actually more interesting, than cooking. So when are we going to have a celebrity farmer?
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        Apr 1 2013: I have some good qualities Greg, and so do a LOT of other people. I think one thing that motivates me is a desire to explore life and experience many different things with curiosity, and a willingness to take risks with the exploration.

        LOL.....OK......why don't too many farmers become famous? I DON'T KNOW! I have used up all the reasons I have in my bag of tricks...LOL:>) You ARE persistant aren't you my friend?

        Yes....I agree....I didn't know about any celebrity chefs twenty years ago. You, my dear friend, are probably creating enough motivation that soon we will see farmers lining up to become famous. I can see it all now....farming competitions. They have that sort of thing now at the country fairs....competions related to farming....horse pulling....log spliting....catching a greased up pig (true....I'm not kidding)!
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          Apr 3 2013: Yes, many people have some amount of some good qualities. But when you rise to a higher position, such as Mrs. Vermont, doesn't it show you have a greater amount of good qualities than most? Are you afraid to acknowledge you might be better than others, Colleen, perhaps afraid of provoking jealousy? It is a problem.

          I hope some farmers do become famous. I read a lot of articles about gourmet restaurants, and I notice that the restaurants often use the same supplier farms, such as Niman Ranch, Weiser Family Farms, and Snake River Farms, for their gourmet ingredients (this would be in the West, it might be different suppliers where you live). I'm thinking the gourmet restaurants and celebrity chefs may eventually pull the farmers along with them into the fame spotlight. I hope so because I think farming is a very satisfying occupation and as more people learn about it they may get some of that feeling of satisfaction and even start doing some farming themselves.
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          Apr 4 2013: Oh, I had wanted to ask, Colleen, why you think things change. What happened that twenty years ago we had no famous chefs, and now we have a few? Is it just that people get bored and want something new?
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        Apr 5 2013: Hi again Greg,
        No, I am not afraid to acknowledge my accomplishments, and what I have done in the life adventure does not make me a better person.....in my perception.

        We have a vegetable/fruit farm in my community (northern Vermont), that supplies produce as far as Boston. I believe growers in the west are much bigger than in this area. You may be right regarding celebrity chefs and resturaunts using good organic produce may pull farmers along.

        Each year, the Vermont Farm Bureau awards Horse and Dairy Farms, 'Farm of Distinction" recognition, for which the criteria is...safe and secure, management, maintenance, equipment, nutrition, veterinary care, control of pests & vermin, fire protection & prevention, "curb" appeal (overall general appearence of farm & facilities, and relationship with the community (interaction with community organizations and schools, etc.). This may not be the "fame" you are talking about, but it IS recognition and appreciation, at least in the state.

        Regarding your question about change......I don't know for sure. I would quess that people start talking about something, as you are doing here, it motivates other people who may want to promote the idea?

        There was a local person (nearby community) who appeared on one of those reality shows....best chef....or something like that. I didn't watch it, but apparently it did not go well. When she came back to her bakery/cafe after the show, business dropped drastically, and she went out of business! Apparently, the dynamic of the competition was rough and nasty.
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          Apr 5 2013: Do you think any person is better than any other person, Colleen? Or are we all 100% equal?

          Like your comment on change. But then the question becomes, why hasn't someone talked about it before? After all, farming has been around thousands of years.
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        Apr 7 2013: Greg,
        Do I think any person is better than any other person?

        Better.....no. Different.....yes. We all have different talents and skills, and this to me is part of the beauty of being human. We all have the ability to contribute to the whole, and in my perception, the contribution may be equally valuable to the whole. I believe, only a person in him/herself can determine how beneficial their contribution is. We can look at details of a person's life, and maybe in our own minds perceive more or less contribution, and at the end of the day, it is ONLY the individual him/herself who knows for sure.

        You brought Tom Cruise into the discussion....
        He is indeed famous. From what we hear, two wives have left him because of violence and abuse. Many of the movies he does are violent....is this a good role model?

        Paul Newman is another famous actor...
        From what we hear, he received many honorary awards for his humanitarian work, he had 50 loving, respectful years with his wife, "Newman's Own" food company donated all post tax income and royalties to charity (as of June 2012 donations exceed $330 million)......

        Both actors.....both famous. I think I said in this discussion, or maybe your other related discussion, that in my perception, it is how we use a position that is important, rather than simply being in that position (fame for example).

        Farming has been around thousands of years....why hasn't someone talked about it before?

        I believe some folks talk about it a LOT, and some folks not so much. It's been noticed that some kids in city schools have no idea where the food they eat comes from, and I think it would be GREAT to have more educational programs on this topic. I personally am very aware and grateful for farmers and their huge contribution to our well-being:>)
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          Apr 7 2013: Well, that's a little too neutral for me, Colleen. I cannot say that a man sitting on death row for murdering people is just different from me, I'd say he is a worse human being than me.

          Actually, I believe Tom left Nicole Kidman. Katie left Tom. Don't remember about his first wife. Never heard anything about violence and abuse.

          To me "better" isn't just typical charitable activities. I also think someone could be a better person than most other people if he or she entertained millions of people, after all entertaining people is a kind of service, too, and takes a lot of work and risk.

          Right, many people talk about farming, but why haven't we done it enough to where there are famous farmers? After all, farming has been around thousands of years.

          Wonder if we could say Abraham was a famous farmer, from the Bible? His occupation was goat farming. Do we think Abraham would have been just as close to God if he had had some other occupation?

          Agreed, it's really good to know where your food comes from. What are you, Colleen, doing to get people thinking about this?

          On another conversation we were having: Colleen, you were saying there's lots of snails in your garden I could eat. You know, I have observed that snails have a sixth sense. When I first started eating them, I would run across them now and then. Now it's like they see me coming, because I never run across them any more. But it may be that they hate being eaten live, as I do. Perhaps you could harvest them if you then cooked them and ate them, like the French do. Have you eaten cooked snails with butter, quite good.
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        Apr 7 2013: I agree Greg....""better" isn't just typical charitable activities". That is why I wrote... "We can look at details of a person's life, and maybe in our own minds perceive more or less contribution, and at the end of the day, it is ONLY the individual him/herself who knows for sure".

        You write..."Agreed, it's really good to know where your food comes from. What are you, Colleen, doing to get people thinking about this?"

        I create/work/play in the gardens at my home, which have over 500 varities of perennials, herbs, fruits, veggetables, tropical plants, water features....etc. etc. The gardens have been featured in 4 publications and a TV segment, and folks (including garden clubs, spiritual groups, etc.) have visited for 15 years. Photographers do lots of photos in the gardens, including stock photos, weddings, and other celebratory events. I have also helped many people design, create and plant gardens, with plants supplied from my gardens:>)

        http://smugdud.smugmug.com/Quintessential%20Vermont )

        I have an opportunity all summer to teach people about how to grow and use fresh food and herbs, and how to use herbs for medicinal purposes. We also often talk about the benefits of growing things in our environment.....cleans the air and water. I speak with people wherever they are with the process....sometimes beginner gardeners just starting out, and sometimes master gardners, looking for new ideas:>)

        I have also served on local and regional planning commissions, development review boards and project review committees for about 15 years. These volunteer positions give me the opportunity to encourage environmentally friendly, sustainable development and growth:>)

        Cooking and eating the snails in the gardens has been suggested, and it simply does not appeal to me.....thanks for the suggestion anyway:>)
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          Apr 7 2013: Fantastic activities, Colleen. How did you get into gardening, start learning about it?

          On the other issue, I may be ill-equipped to say, because I've not really gotten to spend time around farmers and see what they're like as people. I grew up in a suburb where there is no farming. But doesn't it seem like if you have something great to offer, you're going to rise to prominence, that no matter how much you try you can't keep your light hidden under a bushel, other people are going to notice. And the reverse seems true as well, if you don't rise to prominence, it means you don't have much light.

          Explain to me how you can have great character and keep your light hidden under a bushel, not become famous.
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        Apr 7 2013: Thanks Greg,
        The activities I pursue in this life adventure are all fun, interesting, educational, challenging, contribute to my own learning, growth and evolution, and hopefully contribute to the whole:>)

        How did I get into gardening?

        My mother was in the gardens when she went into labor for me, so I like to say I was born in a garden:>) My parents had an extensive vegetable garden, as well as fruits and flowers. We (family of 8 kids) had fresh fruits and veggies all summer, and canned from the garden in the winter. I was always in the gardens with my mom, so I learned by doing. It always felt very natural to me, and I've had gardens my whole life.....60+ years.

        If you looked at the link, what you see was created when I retired about 15 years ago. There were flower gardens around the house, a veggie garden and herbs, and I kind of got addicted, so the gardens took on a life of their own! I just went along for the ride! LOL:>) It's actually great exercise, creative, supplies the body with good food, and is good for our environment....win/win!

        I DO know a lot of farmers, and I think I mentioned in another comment, that my perception of most of them is that they are practical people who are very aware of the earth and the environment. I don't know any farmer who longs for "prominence".

        I do not agree that "if you don't rise to prominence, it means you don't have much light." There are LOTS of people in our world who have VERY BRIGHT LIGHTS, and have no desire or need for prominence. Their lights shine brightly, and they have no need for fame.
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          Apr 7 2013: So I guess the question then becomes, how did they get into gardening?

          Well, on the second question, I tend to think that if you have something great, you feel compelled to share it, you almost can't help yourself. And as you share it, you rise to prominence, because you meet more people, you talk about yourself more, etc. Therefore, I reason, someone who hasn't become prominent probably doesn't have anything that great. Do you disagree with my logic? Where is the flaw?
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        Apr 7 2013: Greg,
        You ask...how did they get into gardening? You mean my parents?

        I think it was a lot more common back then for people to have gardens, and raise their own vegetables. They went through the depression with 7 kids (I was born after that). They didn't have much money, and my mother was very conscious of eating healthy food. We never had junk food, soda, etc. The ONLY time we had soda, is once a year, when my mom made a case of home made root beer. I especially remember helping to cap the bottles....seemed like a lot of fun:>)

        I simply do not agree with the idea that if someone hasn't become prominent probably s/he doesn't have anything that great to share. I know SO many people who are NOT prominent/famous, who, in my humble perception, have SO much to share.
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          Apr 7 2013: Yeah, I meant your folks. Do you think many people have gardens because their folks had them? Or are you unusual, if so why?

          Agreed, non-prominent people can have a lot to share. I'm just thinking people who become prominent have even more, as I said before, it seems almost impossible to me that if you have something really good you can hide it.
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        Apr 7 2013: Yes, I think some folks have gardens because it was something they learned with their parents. I also notice a new interest in gardening. Perhaps because of the economy...perhaps because some folks want more healthy food....or are more interested in our environment. Gardens are good for all of those reasons.

        Yeah....I'm probably "unusual".....let me count the ways.....LOL:>) I couldn't resist!

        I don't perceive people "hiding" what they have to share. I just don't see a lot of folks seeking prominence or fame.
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          Apr 7 2013: Well, do you agree that if you have something really good, you feel compelled to share it and keep sharing it, to find ways to keep sharing it with more people, until finally you are coming into the spotlight and rising to prominence? Or can you really be comfortable not talking about this great thing you have? I myself cannot, if I have something good I have to share it, call attention to it.

          What motivated you to seek Mrs. Vermont?

          How is it that magazines come and photograph your garden? Do you contact them and tell them it's a good one? What motivates you to do that?

          What was your motivation to be in commercials, that's a hard thing to do, you have to have motivation.
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        Apr 7 2013: Greg,
        I share because it feels good to connect with people in that way, and yes, I absolutely love sharing if I have something to share.

        I was asked to do the Mrs. Vermont thing, and I said.....sure.....why not? Remember.....I am an explorer and risk taker!

        The first magazine the gardens appeared in was because a friend who is a professional photographer took a bunch of photos and submitted them for consideration. I have other friends who are photographers who wanted to do shots in the gardens. Word kind of got around. A friend who has a son who works at a TV station suggested they do a TV segment on the gardens. Most garden clubs in the area know about the gardens. I never contacted ANYONE about visiting the gardens. The gardens were always open to visiters, and folks stopped in all the time. As a matter of fact, a couple years ago, I started discouraging people from coming because I was getting physically tired.....not from the gardens, but because I was helping to care for two sick brothers....one died in January.

        The commercial work was an off-shoot of theater. I started doing community musical theater as a way to get back to music. All of a sudden, I was asked to do some TV commercials. After a while, I was over-exposed in this region ( I represented a drug store, insurance co., car dealership, etc. etc....all at the same time).

        I was having fun with the adventure, so I went to Boston, got an agent, and started doing commercial work, in- house industrial films, movies and TV, while also moving into professional theater. From there I went to NY and got an agent there. Then I bashed my head in with a horseback riding accident. I have over-sensitivity to light and sound, and balance issues, which kind of put me out of the acting, singing, dancing, modeling business, and that's ok 'cause it was time to move to something else:>)

        That's when I was invited to guest lecture at the university and I started doing all the volunteer work.
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          Apr 7 2013: Thanks for replying, Colleen. How does one get asked to pursue Mrs. Vermont, I would have thought people did that of their own initiative.

          It sounds like some things came across your plate without your actively seeking them, but I would say you had special friends, not everyone has a professional photographer for a friend, and that says something about you, too. Also, you did actively seek some difficult things, and that reflects well on you, too. Thus far you have not convinced me that people who acquire positive honors don't have better character than others.
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        Apr 7 2013: My pleasure Greg:>)

        I personally knew a couple previous Mrs. Vermonts, we were all involved with an acting/modeling agency. The director thought it would be good for me, so they all talked me into doing it. So, I said in the previous comment, that I was asked to do it, which is true. I still had to do the homework and fullfill the criteria.

        Yes Greg, things came across my plate without me seeking them, and there have been times in my life that I've felt kind of lazy, because I didn't pursue things like most other people. It seems like adventures pursued me! As I said before, things just sort of flowed.....one to the next...everything interconnected......and I am a very curious explorer of life.....a risk taker:>)

        I'm not trying to convince you of anything Greg. I realize that you choose your own thoughts, feelings and perceptions. I'm simply sharing my perspective:>)
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          Apr 8 2013: Well, okay, so you had been involved with an acting/modeling agency, which takes more self-confidence, I think, than most people have. Also, you state you are curious and a risk taker, that also makes you special, I think most people aren't so much. So I'm still thinking that you, a person more famous than most if not world-famous, have exceptional character.

          Well, I did think we were trying to figure out an ambiguous point, Colleen. I tend to think that people who achieve an unusual honor or distinction, such as Mrs. Vermont, have exceptional character. I believe you think they don't, have I understood you correctly? I was rather thinking, or hoping, we would reach a conclusion on which position is correct, and one of us would at least somewhat change his or her position.
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        Apr 11 2013: Thanks Greg,
        Yes, It seems like we understand each other....

        I believe it is HOW we use the position and opportunity that is the important piece of the puzzle of all life experiences. You may not agree with my perspective, and that is ok:>)
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      Apr 7 2013: Thankfully, the miserable, greedy Steen is not related to me...LOL:>)
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    Mar 14 2013: Great topic Greg! With only 2% of our population growing the majority of the food for the rest you would think that there might be one or two standouts that catch the attention and imagination of the public, alas it is not so. Sadly farmers work long hours at difficult tasks and are, in general, severly underpaid for their work. It is sad, because if anyone should be highly compensated, it should be the people who sustain us at the most basic level. To your question, I offer a few theories: Farmers are a notoriously independant lot. If that were not the case, they could rule the world! People who farm tend not to be the type of people who value fame. Finaly, there is a certain bias against food producers from several corners of society. Somtimes it seems to ccome from those who think: "Why should I be paying someone for food?" Or, perhaps from those who realize the implications of my first theory.
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      Mar 17 2013: Why would farmers be so independent? What about farming would make one not value fame?
  • Mar 14 2013: Big difference between fame and importance.
    • Mar 14 2013: Yes there is and there is a big difference
      between fame and famine.
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      Mar 17 2013: Can you say more? Most famous people are important, no?
      • Mar 17 2013: I guess it depends how they became famous. Famous entertainers, artists and sports figures are fun to watch and if they can make millions smile or give millions something to root for as a pastime, they deserve their fame. Are they important? Only to the extent entertainment holds a place in your life.

        Famous doctors, scientists, military leaders, or politicians generally achieve their fame by performing public service, discovering something that can advance humanity, or by putting their lives on the line to protect the masses. This group is both famous and important.

        Important is a relative thing. Entertainers and artists might be considered important for their work within the profession, important to their families, and even important to groups for their philanthropy and volunteer work. But their fame is usually not related to these activities.
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          Mar 31 2013: I guess I feel differently, Robert, that I think famous entertainers, artists and athletes are doing something important when they entertain, they are stimulating people, giving them something to think about, evoking emotion in them. In my mind anyone who is famous for doing something good is important.
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          Mar 31 2013: Greg....you say..."I think famous entertainers, artists and athletes are doing something important when they entertain, they are stimulating people, giving them something to think about, evoking emotion in them."

          I agree.

          With that in mind, farmers are producing food for us, and in my mind and heart, that is equally as important.

          The difference is, that in order to keep people interested in them, so that people will want to "buy" their work, entertainers, artists and athletes, generally need to be recognizable to the public.....yes?

          Farmers don't need that recognition....people will continue to buy food.....yes?
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    Apr 1 2013: There were farmers that did become famous for example;
    Presidents,
    George Washington
    Thomas Jefferson
    Jimmy Carter
    And others

    Businessmen,
    Bob Evans
    Orville Redenbacher
    John Deere

    And Famous for the business of farming there is John Chapman (AKA Johnny Appleseed).
    Although I guess you could argue that he ran nurseries, and by some that may not be consider farming.
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      Apr 1 2013: Well, Don, I meant famous for farming. The presidents were not famous for farming. Orville Redenbacher is famous for a retail product. John Deere, is that a real guy? I would say the product is famous, the man is not. Who is Bob Evans? J Appleseed, that might be a little closer, although as far as I know he wandered around, he wasn't exactly a farmer who stays in one place and farms.

      It seems there ought to be a farmer who is famous like celebrity chefs are famous, a farmer who's famous like Wolfgang Puck and Gordon Ramsey are famous. Yet so far I don't see one. Any idea why not?
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        Apr 1 2013: My mistake, it was farmers that made John Deere famous.
        John Deere was a blacksmith, his fame started with the invention of the self-polishing plow blade. Before it farmers had to stop every so often to clean the mud of the blades.

        Hmm? I’ll guess that to Wolfgang Puck, Gordon Ramsey and other chefs that there a famous farmers in their world.

        But you’re right; people don’t become farmer, for the fame.
        Although farmers often do like a little fame, those contest for the biggest pumpkin, best flower, and such are big deals in their world.
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    Mar 25 2013: greg, I am beginning to think that you are obsessed with fame.
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      Mar 31 2013: What is obsession, Thaddea? Thinking about it all the time, or a great deal of the time? No, I don't do that. I'm certainly interested in it.
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    Mar 17 2013: I am not certain about why all the farmers I have ever known wer so independent. It may be, the cause of them farming, may be the effect of farming.
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    Mar 14 2013: P T Barnum once said to the press, "I don't care what you say about me as long as you spell the name correct". What do you think the most important thing in an election is .... name recognition. People do not say read the book XYZ they say Have you read Clancys new book or have you seen John Waynes new movie. Billions of dollars ride on the success of the movie and the name sells it ...

    Studios and agents spend millions on their "stars" to be sure the press, and the fans are leaked the right info and they stay in the news.

    Small farmers are becoming a thing of the past. Most big farms are owned by banks and corporations and have on site managers and workers. Farming is expensive, time consuming, and extremely hard labor. That is not glamerous and is hardly a escape from reality that is sought by movie goers.

    In the movies the struggling mom with three kids and a louse of a husband who left her ... lives in a nice house, has a nice car, enjoys long baths, good wine, and a knock out wardrobe, every once in a while she does something motherly. Yeah like that is for real. People pay for the right to escape .. to be Marilyn Monroe and travel the world with no money staying at the best hotels and eating in the finest cafes in Europe ... no cares about tomarrow.

    It is all about the fight between a escape and reality. Would you rather be James Bond or shoveling cow crap?

    I wish you well. Bob.
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      Mar 17 2013: I like the escape idea, Bob.

      Well, we have business leaders whose lives don't seem terribly glamorous, yet still become famous. Like Steve Jobs. Nor is his life about escape. So I'm not sure you've nailed it yet.
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        Mar 17 2013: Greg, Perhaps it is not nailed down yet but we are leaving the stars farmer argument. If I pace a few CEOs on the block here we can see many differences.

        Bill Gates: More famous for being super rich than for achievements. Not a slave to fashion. Private life is very quite. Does not seek the spotlight.

        Steve Wozniak: Co founder with Jobs at apple. Not a household name. Quite. Private life almost unknown. Never in spotlight.

        Donald Trump: Loves the spotlight. Micromanager. Flamboyant. Super ego.

        Steve Jobs: Loves the spotlight. Sought the leadership in Pixlar, Apple, and all other places he worked. Idea generator, visionary, Super A personality. Always in power struggles. Personally introduced all new products ... became the face of Apple. Flamboyant. Charismatic. Egotistic. Workaholic.

        We all know a hard charger ... a guy / gal who runs at 300% all the time .... sets their hair on fire and never slow down even when they reach the top. Some of these are simply super achievers who accept and embrace the "challange". Some want the money. Some want the fame. Some want it all.

        I don't think that we can make a inferance of "escape" or anything else to CEOs. Each must be looked at individually and maybe the answer to the CEO is as simple as yep that is ole "Harry / Jane alright". Love them or hate them thats just the way they are.

        I have been thinking about Jobs. We knew him as the face of Apple ... he put his picture with the brand and the product. For years I knew the picture of him with no name ... Then when he got cancer we all knew about it ... big news ... all media .... picture and name everywhere. All of a sudden that face holding a iPod was Steve Jobs. Did his illness enhance his fame? Why did he only make a TED talk after the illness? I don't mean to be cruel but am looking to answer your question.

        All the best. Bob.
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          Mar 18 2013: well, I love the spotlight idea. But why couldn't a farmer love the spotlight?
  • Mar 14 2013: Colleen nailed this one.

    The career and income of Tom Cruise is 100% dependent on fame. Not true of any farmer.
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      Mar 14 2013: Thanks Barry.....this is true.....Cruise is 100% dependent on fame and popularity. The farmer is mostly dependent on his/her good management skills and the weather, which can be SO unpredictable and difficult to manage.
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        Mar 17 2013: You don't think Cruise has genuine acting skills which others don't?

        Why couldn't a farmer be famous for his management skills or ability to manage unpredictable weather?
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          Mar 18 2013: I think Cruise has some acting skills that others may not have.....we are all different:>)

          A farmer COULD be famous for whatever s/he chooses.....IF.....s/he promoted him/herself in that way.
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        Mar 19 2013: colleen, I can't find the conversation where you pointed out that the people who used to make bags can now be employed in recycling, so I'll say thanks here.
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    Gail . 50+

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    Mar 14 2013: Does make one wonder, doesn't it?

    Today, most farms are huge corporate conglomerates, so you would have to make pieces of paper (corporate charters) exciting to read before you could stimulate the most meager of interest.

    (If you look at the environmental damage that these corporate farms do, you will see how undeserving they are of praise. Lost topsoil and polluted aquifers. Then look at the threat to our survival by reason of economics - where food is sold on the global market even if people are starving to death locally - because corporate charterers of mega companies lack empathy)
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      Mar 17 2013: Still, TED, business leaders like Bill Gates and Warren Buffett become famous, and their charters shouldn't be any more exciting, right?
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        Gail . 50+

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        Mar 17 2013: Money does not make a man. It only makes a man rich (or poor). I don't worship at the feet of wealth.
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          Mar 31 2013: No, you don't worship there, but you agree that some business leaders are famous, such as Bill Gates and Warren Buffet? Is what they do more exciting than what a farmer does? I myself wouldn't think so, I would think that when you get right down to it, what a farmer does is the most exciting.
  • Mar 13 2013: Movie actors are often more inspiring to people. And, they're out in the public eye, so they have that going for them.
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      Mar 17 2013: Inspiring in what way?

      Actually, most of actors' lives are on closed movie sets, where they're not in the public eye.
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    Mar 13 2013: There are perhaps a few hundred famous actors, while there are a several hundred million farmers. That's why.
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      Mar 17 2013: well this could cut both ways. If there are several hundred million farmers, wouldn't a few have achieved fame?

      There are several hundred million businesspeople, and a few have achieved fame.
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    Mar 13 2013: Go shadow a farmer for say three days, 24-hours-a-day. Then re-submit your question. And another thing, survey pre-schoolers regarding Old Macdonald and Tom Cruise. I think Macdonald will win in that demographic.
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      Mar 13 2013: Do you remember "Mr. Greenjeans" as well?
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        Mar 13 2013: I do! And the first recollection I have of him is. . . BORING! :-(
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      Mar 17 2013: ed, you're trying to say farming is boring? Actually, a lot of moviemaking is pretty boring, just sitting in your trailer, memorizing your lines.
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        Mar 17 2013: True. But the public does not see Tom Cruise sitting in his trailer. They see him flying an F-15, or performing some mission impossible. Thus Tom is more famous and popular than Farmer Jones.
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          Mar 18 2013: nice. But I'm still unconvinced ed, we see people people such as business leaders become famous who are not doing as spectacular things as flying an F-15 or performing some mission impossible.

          wonder if fame revolves around doing something new, for example, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs became famous around computers, which are something new on planet earth. Is it possible that farmers rarely do anything new, only follow tried and true methods?
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        Mar 18 2013: RE: "nice. But I am still unconvinced. . . " Newness is irrelevant. People were acting before Tom Cruise came along. People have been running the mile for centuries. The bloke (whoever he is I'm sure he's pretty famous) who did it in under 4-minutes was doing something that had been done by tens-of-thousands before, he just did it in a fraction-of-a-second less. Tom is famous because many, many people want to see him ply his craft. Very, very few sane people want to watch a farmer do his thing. YAWN!
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          Mar 18 2013: Sorry, ed, still unconvinced. People want to see a very edited version of Tom doing his thing, as we've already agreed they would be bored if they had to see all the behind-the-scenes stuff such as the retakes, rehearsal, etc. But aren't there high points in a farmer's day, or career, that could be newsworthy? I certainly see stories in the paper about farming, "urban farming," and so on.

          Sounds like you wouldn't be into "urban farming," such as having a little vegetable garden and growing a little of your own food, because you would consider it boring. Or am I wrong on that?

          I love your point that acting is an ancient practice as well. Thanks for pointing that out.
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        Mar 18 2013: RE: "Sorry, ed, still unconvinced. . . "Ye Gads, Man! Farming is boring even when it is a 100% success. Have you ever wanted to see, or read about, "Great Moments in Farming?" . . . (yawn). Or, how about, "The Top 10 Greatest Tractor Drivers of all Time"? . . . (ZZZZzzzzz). Or, the ever-popular Hay Baling Hall of Fame"? Not exactly edge-of-your-seat action. I grow my own tomatoes and Armenian Cucumbers but I do not consider it a good idea to film the many activities involved to be shown in theaters across the nation. I appeal to your sense of logic and rationality sir. Go watch a farmer for a while. Then , when you awaken, abandon this debate. ;-}
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          Mar 18 2013: well, I certainly watch videos about farming on youtube. I usually don't leave my home city to watch movies, and the movies shown here are the more popular type. I could certainly see myself going to a movie on farming.

          What if you could talk in an interesting, innovative way about growing tomatoes and cucumbers? Then an audience would be interested?

          Feels like I'm irritating you, ed, but thus far I can't give up my question. Tell me again why the world mourned when Steve Jobs died, but the world has never mourned when a farmer died.

          At some point I should read about Eli Whitney. He's the closest I can think of to a famous farmer, but I don't know if he farmed or only invented farm machinery.

          Could it be that no farmer has gotten to the size where he touched the whole world, that most farmers are only feeding their local neighbors.
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        Mar 18 2013: RE: "Well I certainly watch. . . " No you are not irritating me. I find it interesting that you are puzzled as to why no one has become a world-famous celebrity based upon their farming ability. I think your tongue is in your cheek a bit on this one. You know that non-farmers--that is 96.7% of the population-- consider the topic of farming to be pretty-much void of the mystery, intrigue, romance, and high-tension excitement so plentiful in a Tom Cruise film. Someone is pulling my leg. Eli Whitney might have been a farmer, no one cares. What they do care about is that he invented the machine that allowed mass-production of clothes. The reason the whole world has never mourned the death of a farmer is that no farmer has ever done anything to make himself known to the whole world. Also, computer engineers die every day and the world doesn't notice. Job's death was significant to the world because he became mega-rich (which automatically brings fame) and co-founded the richest company in America +/-. Actors die every day too and the world pays no mind. To rise from anonymity to fame one must attract the attention of a nation, an act easier to accomplish as an actor than as a farmer. Do a BIng search for "Famous Farmers".
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          Mar 19 2013: Well, ed, let's say TED had existed 25 years ago, and I had posed the question, "Why is no chef as famous as Sylvester Stallone?," because 25 years ago there weren't celebrity chefs that I recall. Would you have said, "Because cooking is boring"? And yet today there are famous chefs, such as Wolfgang Puck. So things do change, perhaps it's in the presentation, they found a way to make cooking interesting, with competition and such. Wonder why things change?
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        Mar 19 2013: RE: "Well, ed, let's say TED. . . " If your point is that things could change and the general public could become intensely interested in paying money to watch Hollywood productions featuring all things farming, my answer is yes, it could happen (if it does happen I'm pretty sure there will be flying pigs on the farm). But until it does happen Tom Cruise is going to be more famous than any farmer could ever be based purely on his, or her, activities as a farmer. The OP asks, "Why is no farmer as famous as Tom Cruise?" Still my answer is because farming is b-o-r-i-n-g.
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          Mar 20 2013: yeah, I wonder if farming is so boring, ed. I grew up in a suburb of Los Angeles but then I got interested in dairy farming and I moved to a dairy farming community and tried for three years to get a job milking cows. Every weekend I would go where the dairy farms were and ask for work but never got hired. But I found just walking around there really interesting, seeing the cows, watching the work. I wonder how unusual I am, I do see that there is at least one whole TV cable channel devoted to things agricultural, so I think there is some interest.

          True that spectacular things happen in a Tom Cruise movie, but we the audience know they're all fake. So what is his fame based on?
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        Mar 20 2013: RE: "yeah, I wonder if farming. . . " Notice I didn't say there is no one on Earth who finds farming to be interesting. The question asks why no farmer is as famous as Tom Cruise. I hope you recall me saying it is because farm (yawn) ing is BORING. As for how unusual you are I cannot offer anything constructive on that. Be careful about judging things based upon whether there is a cable channel devoted to it. Upon what is Tom's fame based? I think it is a combination of him entertaining hundreds of millions of people using cinematic creations of electrifying, fantastic, fake, adventures, and of course his devotion to Scientology. :-)
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          Mar 25 2013: Are you saying farming is boring to the farmer himself? Or only to someone who might watch him do it?
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        Mar 25 2013: RE: "Are you saying farming is . . . " No. Farming is only boring as a source of mass audience entertainment. I am sure the average person who grows food finds it both challenging and rewarding. It is the only essential industry, but it is not a good way to become famous.
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          Mar 25 2013: edward, thanks for continuing to converse with me. I do want to make sure we are agreed on our terms. I did ask in the original question why no farmer is as famous as Tom Cruise. But I did not mean famous in the same way as Tom Cruise. It's possible that you're right, that farming is boring as a source of mass audience entertainment, entertainment being the key word here. But do you still not think a farmer could be extremely famous, for example a farmer could educate the world about farming and food and thus become famous, or come up with some innovative idea that increases food production and thus become famous. These might not be entertaining, but could they not lead to fame? If not, why not? My question is sincere, I think it's quite surprising that the average person can't name two or three famous farmers.
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        Mar 25 2013: RE: "edward, thanks for continuing . . " I do not think a farmer could become "extremely famous" by functioning as a farmer. Fame similar to Tom Cruise's could come if the farmer did something not normally associated with farming, like discovering the fountain of youth, or negotiating peace in the Middle East. No one can become famous for farming because FARMING IS BORING and will not produce multi-millions of dollars in ticket sales from people willing to pay to watch tilling, fertilizing, planting, harvesting, milking, slopping, etc.
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          Mar 25 2013: Yes, thanks, edward. In my mind it brings up another interesting question, which is, why are some things boring and others are not? Are we bored by things that don't seem to require much thought? Or by things we feel we could do ourselves if we had to? Or.....?
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      Apr 7 2013: What do you think about economy of scale, that things become cheaper as we produce them in greater quantity?
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          Apr 7 2013: It seems a little contradictory, Don, if getting bigger allows you to sell products more cheaply, because of economy of scale, how are you getting richer? Wonder if that's a bit of an urban myth, that the rich are getting richer.
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          Apr 7 2013: What I'm wondering now is, Don, what is so awful about working for a big corporation as opposed to owning your own farm? Either way you get to farm, which is presumably what you love. Probably you're not going to do things too differently whether you work for someone else or work for yourself.
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          Apr 7 2013: Not leading, Don. Not arguing, just enjoy learning. What I wonder is, is a big company for some reason more likely to practice fraud and corruption than a little guy, after all a little guy can practice fraud and corruption, too.

          Do you really not know who Tom Cruise is, that does surprise me, I'd say he and Brad Pitt are the most famous actors in the world. Do you know who Brad Pitt is?
  • Mar 16 2013: Thomas Jefferson and George Washington were "gentlemen" farmers, were they not?
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      Mar 17 2013: yes, but I'm thinking they were famous for other achievements, not for their farming. I wonder why no farmer is famous for his/her farming?
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      Mar 17 2013: Absolutely!
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    Mar 14 2013: The same reason as why wives are not as exciting as mistresses. We don't seem to appreciate what comes easy. Food or sex.
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      Mar 18 2013: Pabitra, watching an actor in a movie also comes fairly easily. You pay your ten dollars, and in you go. At home, on television, you can watch practically for free.
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          Apr 7 2013: True, although when I watch at another person's house, we usually turn the sound off during commercials and talk. I myself don't have a TV, haven't had one for 30 years. You have a TV, Don?
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    Mar 14 2013: Hi Greg, Can you imagine what farming is going to be in the future? Are we going to need farms?
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      Mar 16 2013: I'm not an expert. I live in a suburb of L.A. called Glendale. What I see here is movement towards more organic, and also towards "urban farming," where people are getting plots in a communal garden and growing some of their own produce. So I'd see those changes.

      Why do you ask, John? How could we ever not need farms?