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David Hood

Author and speaker, Global Marketing Network

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Scottish Independence: confidence, courage and ambition

Scotland, one of the oldest, yet newest, Nations on earth is moving towards an epoch and deciding whether to become Independent. It needs considered reflection to enable it to make this momentous decision, before the Independence Referendum in autumn 2014.

For far too long, and despite the reality of what Scots have given to humanity, our small Nation has been developing a 'cant do' persona. Other Nations have managed to adapt and pursue freedoms and self-respect and progressively moved to a natural, independent state. Its time we did the same.

Strangely, we live within the UK state that is continually discredited. The UK lacks the ability to work on behalf of Scotland and its interests; the UK cannot behave as either a 'good world citizen' or in line with the aspirations of the people of Scotland. Indeed, in the UK, it is arguably the only modern 'democratic' state that tells its own people that they are too stupid, small and impoverished and should not be in charge of their own affairs.

That is not simply the fault of the UK powers-that-be. We allow ourselves to be oppressed into thinking of ourselves as second class citizens within our own 'united' kingdom. We suffer indeed, arguably, from a national 'Stockholm Syndrome' in a captive and dysfunctional UK.

What we need is a real, immediate, and concentrated dose of self-respect, courage, and with it, ambition. Ambition to join the rest of the naturally organised nation-states. Ambition to put right the old wrongs. Ambition to act as a good citizen of the world - and find our age-old guts and determination to make the best of it. We also need friends, family and thinkers from outside of Scotland to stand with us and show us what can be achieved.

For centuries now, many countries have broken free of the 'British' constraints - and none have looked backwards since. Its up to us - and we'd like to hear from you!....

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    Mar 4 2013: I have noticed that feeling oppressed and desire to be independent is frequently associated with feeling inferior. I've seen this on personal and national level.

    I grew up in Ukraine which has not been independent for centuries. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, independence was a buzz-word. However, all post-Soviet political history of Ukraine has been a struggle between two choices - to become an economic satellite of Russia or make alliance with Europe and U.S.A. Ukraine is almost as big as France, abundant natural resources - best soils in Europe, coal, iron, oil; it used to produce buses, automobiles, tanks, airplanes, heavy trucks and bulldozers, and TV sets; it has strategic geographic location, access to Black Sea, etc. Yet, Ukrainian politicians, while boasting with independence, have never had an independent economic and foreign policy. The question for Ukrainian government always is - to join Russia or to join West, with all the political mess that follows.

    Independence starts inside. Declaration of independence does not do much without spiritual transformation. But once this spiritual transformation has taken place, the feeling of inferiority and oppression goes away, and the external attributes of independence don't matter as much. It's better to feel a worthy contributor to a larger whole than to be "independent" on paper and enslaved inside.

    ...I might add that feeling of inferiority is often associated with inflated pride. On a national level, it is often associated with nationalism, derogatory attitude to others, and ethnic strife. On a personal level it seems to cause bullying.
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      Mar 4 2013: Fantastic Arkady.

      I hope that we can have a 'spiritual transformation' before the Referendum!

      D

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