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Ruth-Ellen Henry

Director, Celebrated Hub

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Should governments decide where the poor can live?

In Camden, London there are a group of 750 plus people that live of the state and can't afford to stay there due to new legislation which has come into force. These people can't find jobs at the moment so are reliant on the government to support them with housing costs. Due to this reliance the government has stated it will relocate this group to an area outside of London with even less chance of finding employment but lower housing costs. Surely a better way is to support these people to find sustainable employment? What do you think?

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    Feb 17 2013: Agreed and how do we do it with almost half the voters on govt handouts? A tough issue
    • Feb 24 2013: Thanks for engaging in the discussion James. It is a very tough issue, totally agree with multifaceted solutions that have to come into play; one of which would probably be the reform of the job centre and the collaboration of accountable recruitment company's to reduce frictional and structural unemployment.
      • Feb 24 2013: Neither the job centre, nor the recruitment companies do create jobs, so changes there will just increase the problem. If there are not enough jobs which offer an adequate income to live in London, and/or there are not enough jobs/qualified workers for the existing jobs, they will not be able to change the general problem.

        The main problem nowadays is, that governments seem to believe they gonna generate money by saving money or better, cutting down their costs. That is nonsense, because the still have the same money as before. That speaks books about the general understanding of economy in the average politicians head.

        To keep a business running, you need to invest. A governments long term invest is the people.

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